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    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #1

    I feel I have a fever.

    1. I feel I have a fever.
    2. I feel like I have a fever.

    Do both sound good?

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Not a teacher.

    I'm not 100% sure if temperature could be better.
    (If you are talking about being/getting sick.)

    1. I feel I have some temperature.
    2. I feel like I have some temperature.


    Both sentences have different meanings, though.
    The first one says that you definitely have temperature.
    The second one says that you don't know if you have temperature, but you feel as if you have some.

    Let's see what the teachers or some other members say

    P.S. Both sound good to me, but as said: Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.

    Cheers!

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Quote Originally Posted by Elemoi View Post
    1. I feel I have a fever.
    2. I feel like I have a fever.

    Do both sound good?
    Both are correct.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #4

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    And do they mean exactly the same thing?

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Quote Originally Posted by Elemoi View Post
    And do they mean exactly the same thing?
    No, they don't.

    1. I feel I have a fever. (I know that I'm sick)
    2. I feel like I have a fever. (I don't know whether I'm sick, I feel funny)


    [not a teacher]


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
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    #6

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    (Not a teacher)

    Both are the same, yes. Although, the second could be used to mean 'I feel like the way I do when I have a fever'. The first cannot be used this way.

    Although the first is more definate - 'it is definate I have a fever' - it sounds strange to my ear. I hear 'I feel like I have a fever' much more often, even when used definately.

    Nightmare85, 'some temperature' couldn't work. You can't 'have' temperature, per se. The word 'temperature' is used, in British English at least, to mean 'fever', but it would be used in the same way as fever, i.e., 'I feel like I have a temperature'. The way you used it, it means temperature in general.

  4. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    I can't understand why fever and temperature are countable words.
    (A = one)
    How can you have two fevers (as example)?
    (Or temperatures.)
    This does not make sense to me.

    Cheers!

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Both 'fever' and 'temperature' can be either countable or uncountable.

    And... they usually work like these:

    She's got a fever.
    She's got the flu.
    She's got a cold.
    Last edited by Offroad; 18-Jan-2010 at 04:12.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Interesting.

    Off-topic:
    Offroad, when did you write your language and your country?
    I've just seen it

    Cheers!

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I feel I have a fever.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I can't understand why fever and temperature are countable words.
    (A = one)
    How can you have two fevers (as example)?
    (Or temperatures.)
    This does not make sense to me.

    Cheers!
    You generally don't have two colds or two headaches at the same time either. But in English we still say 'I have a cold/ a headache'.
    You don't have all the fevers, colds, headaches, etc. that are out there to get, but you do have one of them.

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