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    #1

    Wink idiom

    Hello there!


    I've got a question: when do we use "to forget about "? I find it hard to see the difference between "to forget something" and "to forget about something".

    Cheers

    W.

  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: idiom

    P1:I still feel terrible for his attitude towards me.
    P2:Oh, forget about him(or that for the attitude), we have other problems than him to mind.

    or another usage

    Forget about what you have known about it untill now, this is completely different than anyone can imagine.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello there!


    I've got a question: when do we use "to forget about "? I find it hard to see the difference between "to forget something" and "to forget about something".

    Cheers

    W.
    To Forget something’ has a couple of uses:
    Overlook it, it's not important
    Mr. X: Thanks so much for helping.
    Mr. Y:Forget it, it was nothing, (it is a substitute for "don't mention it")
    To some one who does not want to go deep into the matter
    Forget it--you'll never understand this problem. (it means that the possibility of your understanding is remote)
    do not expect something
    The hotel has room service, but forget about anyone serving an elegant meal into your room.

    Forget about it” has varied uses, like:
    No comment" or "I would rather not say”
    Charls:: So john, how much money did you make at the race track yesterday?
    John : : Forget about it!
    do not even ask about it,
    I enjoyed dinner, but as for the party, well, forget about it!
    Don't dwell on things in the past.
    i should forget about it
    a response used to another person's statement meaning 'unbelievable' or 'unreal' or 'extraordinary'
    Tony Montana took 23 gunshots to the body before being caught by the terrorist.
    Listener's response: Forget about it
    Last edited by sarat_106; 18-Jan-2010 at 13:48.


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    #4

    Re: idiom

    I can't think of an example where 'about' contributes to the meaning of the sentence in any way.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    I can't think of an example where 'about' contributes to the meaning of the sentence in any way.
    I agree, but there can be differences in usage even if meaning doesn't change.
    But in this case, I don't think it is worth the effort trying to differentiate between usages - they overlap, and aren't important.


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    #6

    Re: idiom

    Muchas gracias, senior Ray.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: idiom

    There are times when one works and the other doesn't though.

    If you no longer remember a fact, you have forgotten it.
    If you no longer remember that something was ever there, or that it might be important, you have forgotten about it.

    For example, I know there was something called the Magna Carta. I have not forgotten its very existence. But I don't remember what year it was signed. I have forgotten the date it was signed, but I have not forgotten ABOUT the Magna Carta itself.

    Another example: We need to stop by a friend's house to pick something up for him (at his request). We get there and his dog is very aggressive. We would not have agreed to get it for him if we had remembered he had a dog at all. We had forgotten ABOUT the dog. On the other hand, if we get there, but then we can't remember where he said he keeps his spare key, have forgotten the location.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Wink Re: idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    There are times when one works and the other doesn't though.

    If you no longer remember a fact, you have forgotten it.
    If you no longer remember that something was ever there, or that it might be important, you have forgotten about it.

    For example, I know there was something called the Magna Carta. I have not forgotten its very existence. But I don't remember what year it was signed. I have forgotten the date it was signed, but I have not forgotten ABOUT the Magna Carta itself.

    Another example: We need to stop by a friend's house to pick something up for him (at his request). We get there and his dog is very aggressive. We would not have agreed to get it for him if we had remembered he had a dog at all. We had forgotten ABOUT the dog. On the other hand, if we get there, but then we can't remember where he said he keeps his spare key, have forgotten the location.

    Thanks a lot for your answer.

    If someone forgets an appointment. Which one will we use in the following case then?: "You've forgotten our appointment!"/ "you 've forgotten about our appointment!"

    Cheers
    W

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: idiom

    That's a difficult one. Under my suggested rules above, it should be "about," but it sounds natural to leave that out.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. kfredson's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Thanks a lot for your answer.

    If someone forgets an appointment. Which one will we use in the following case then?: "You've forgotten our appointment!"/ "you 've forgotten about our appointment!"

    Cheers
    W
    In this case, either one would work. Perhaps you actually forgot that there was an appointment. It is different when it comes to things you never actually forget:
    "You forgot my birthday."
    Now, while you might say this, it would be clearer to say, "You forgot about my birthday." Sure, you know it always comes on the 19th of January, but you just forgot that it was happening.

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