Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    gerund

    hello this is the first time of me..I had a problemabout gerund..Could you pls help me?This is my question:can we use gerund after gerund ?like learning swiming or jumping going....thank you...

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #2

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by acakmak26 View Post
    hello this is the first time of me..I had a problemabout gerund..Could you pls help me?This is my question:can we use gerund after gerund ?like learning swiming or jumping going....thank you...
    ***NOT A TEACHER***acakmak26: Not all -ing words are called "gerunds." Some are called "participles." (1) You wrote, "I am learning swimming." The first -ing is a participle. It is part of "am learning." It is the present continuous that you are studying in school. The "swimming" is a noun (a something). So people call it a "gerund." I think most native speakers would prefer to say, "I am learning TO SWIM." ("To swim" is called an "infinitive.") If you have more questions, just post them here. Many people will be happy to answer you.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #3

    Re: gerund

    In 'I am going swimming,' what is 'swimming'? Gerund? Or a participle? What is the function of 'swimming'?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    In 'I am going swimming,' what is 'swimming'? Gerund? Or a participle? What is the function of 'swimming'?
    I'd call it a gerund. It's a noun.
    A: I'm going swimming.
    B: Why.
    A: Because swimming is fun.

    In the third sentence, 'swimming' is the obvious noun subject of the clause; and my opinion is that the two 'swimmings' perform the same function.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #5

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    In 'I am going swimming,' what is 'swimming'? Gerund? Or a participle? What is the function of 'swimming'?
    ***NOT A TEACHER***My books tell me that "come" and "go" may be considered linking verbs in sentences such as "He went fishing." Thus the -ing word can be called a "participle." Or: the -ing word may be considered a gerund modifying verb. That is, "He went fishing" was originally "He went a-fishing" which was originally "He went ON fishing."


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #6

    Re: gerund

    Thanks Ray and Parser.

    This is what I think:

    A: Where are you going?
    B: I am going fishing.

    participle
    ----------
    What are you going?
    I am going fishing.

    I can't be at one with the gerund interpretation. However,

    Swimming is fun.
    What is fun?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,596
    #7

    Re: gerund

    Let's be honest guys, in many cases, nobody knows what constitutes a gerund and what should be properly called a present participle.

  3. indonesia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 111
    #8

    Re: gerund

    I always try to see if I can replace the word with another noun.
    I am going fishing.
    I am going home.

    Running everyday keeps me fit.
    Regular exercise everyday keeps me fit.

    As these words can be easily replaced by a noun, I think that makes them a gerund.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #9

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by indonesia View Post
    I always try to see if I can replace the word with another noun.
    I am going fishing.
    I am going home.

    Running everyday keeps me fit.
    Regular exercise everyday keeps me fit.

    As these words can be easily replaced by a noun, I think that makes them a gerund.
    I'm not sure.
    I am running.
    I am president.

    But 'running' isn't a gerund here.
    I am crazy. Maybe it's an adjective!


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #10

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Let's be honest guys, in many cases, nobody knows what constitutes a gerund and what should be properly called a present participle.
    Hello Bhai,

    The way I see it, present participle is related to verb form. End of story. Gerund, participle and infinitive are verbals with distinct (forms and) functions.

    the dancing queen
    dancing = an adjective in present participle form --> It is a participle.

    the broken vase
    broken = an adjective in past participle form --> It is a participle.

    Form and function: it is important to note the difference between the two concepts.

    Quote Originally Posted by indonesia View Post
    I always try to see if I can replace the word with another noun.
    I am going fishing.
    I am going home.

    I think that makes them a gerund.
    A tiny little error slipped in the machinery. 'home' is a noun in form, that is true. However, it functions as an adverb, as an optional predicate adjunct. In fact, regarding the form, 'home' is a truncated prep. phrase (to home = nach Hause).
    'home' is an adverb and so is 'swimming', which makes the latter a participle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm not sure.
    I am running.
    I am president.

    But 'running' isn't a gerund here.
    I am crazy. Maybe it's an adjective!
    "I am running" is a complete sentence comprising the two core elements that are present (overtly or not) in each grammatical sentence:

    I = S(ubject)
    am running = V(erb); Running is the present participle form of the main verb in the verb phrase.
    -----------
    I am president

    I = S
    am = CopV (Cop = copulative = linking)
    president = nominal subject complement (C)

    You can' compare the two sentences to infer function becaue the grammatical structures in the two sentences differ.

    -------------------------

    Running everyday keeps me fit.
    Regular exercise everyday keeps me fit.


    gerund
    Last edited by Kondorosi; 19-Jan-2010 at 07:34.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Simple gerund and Perfect gerund
    By Volcano1985 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Nov-2009, 11:30
  2. [Grammar] Gerund or no gerund after verbs of perception
    By Filip in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 02-May-2009, 03:44
  3. use of th gerund
    By bieasy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Aug-2007, 02:16
  4. Gerund Diagramming Help
    By Tyler07 in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2007, 22:33
  5. Gerund or Present Participle?
    By atm in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2006, 14:55

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •