Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1,704
    #1

    have spoke, have broke

    Are these forms correct? Where, when and by whom can they be used?
    I thought they were both incorrect dialect/slang forms as said by Rocky: 'I should've broke your thumb!'
    But the same I see in the song by Uriah Heep, 'Lady in Black': 'Thus having spoke she turned away'. The song is maintained in biblical style. So, I am confused and waiting hopefully for your response.
    Last edited by mmasny; 21-Jan-2010 at 18:43.

  1. euncu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,314
    #2

    Re: have spoke, have broke

    Neither is correct.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1,704
    #3

    Re: have spoke, have broke

    So why did the band put such a form in their song? Can you explain what was their purpose? The whole song is very pompous so it seems a bit strange to me that the author used an improper form. I suppose there is some reason for which it sounds grandiloquent but why shoud a slang expression sound this way?

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #4

    Re: have spoke, have broke

    In lyrics, grammar does not matter that much.
    The rhyme and rhythm is more important.
    That's why you should never analyze lyrics' grammar and try to learn them.
    (Not all songs use bad grammar, but you should use other sources for English.)

    I should have broken your thumb.

    And are you 100% sure he says "broke"?

    Sometimes I misunderstand things when I listen.

    Cheers!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1,704
    #5

    Re: have spoke, have broke

    Yes, I'm pretty sure. There's no trace of [n] at all... You seem not to be familiar with such a form, are you? I think I understand it now, thank you very much.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #6

    Re: have spoke, have broke

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    In lyrics, grammar does not matter that much.
    The rhyme and rhythm is more important.
    That's why you should never analyze lyrics' grammar and try to learn them.
    So true! So very, very true!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-Apr-2007, 10:42
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2007, 06:41
  3. single spoke and sub header spoke
    By alicia410 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 20-Feb-2007, 21:03
  4. what is single spoke or sub-header spoke
    By shanta01 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Nov-2006, 06:55
  5. break down or broke?
    By bosunyum in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Jun-2006, 04:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •