Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Dec 2008
    • Posts: 177
    #1

    Check Please

    E.g., You need to come to the lab with one sample of type A, type B, and type C.

    Does the above sentence imply that you would need one sample of each types, not one sample of the 3 together?

    Do I must put "each" before "of" in order to mean 1 of each?

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by vcolts; 23-Jan-2010 at 10:13.


    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 22
    #2

    Re: Check Please

    Check Please
    Here's my opinion.

    Your original sentence:

    You need to come to the lab with one sample of type A, type B, and type C.

    implies that "you" must bring one sample of each. To be more precise, the statement could be written as:

    You need to come to the lab with one sample each of type A, type B and type C. (one sample of each type)

    or

    You need to come to the lab with one sample composed of type A, type B and type C. (a single sample of a mixture of the three types)

Similar Threads

  1. Check
    By Tdol in forum Phrasal Verbs
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2017, 10:55
  2. check and deposit, what do they mean?
    By newlife in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-May-2009, 13:01
  3. [General] check and check =?
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2009, 14:05
  4. [Grammar] check if...
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2008, 12:01
  5. live check to check
    By kpkroy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2008, 14:49

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •