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    #1

    I don't mind

    When answering the question : "Do you like doing the dishes ?" what's a correct answer ?
    a) "No, I don't mind (it)."
    b) "Yes, I do mind (it)."
    c) "I don't mind (it)."

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: I don't mind

    Quote Originally Posted by ph2004 View Post
    When answering the question : "Do you like doing the dishes ?" what's a correct answer ?
    a) "No, I don't mind (it)."
    b) "Yes, I do mind (it)."
    c) "I don't mind (it)."
    All are correct. We normally tend to use either of the last two answers to express negation with emphasis (b) or affirmation (c). The first is a case of double negative and traditional grammar holds that double negatives combine to form an affirmative. So You can also use it express affarmation

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    #3

    Re: I don't mind

    Quote Originally Posted by ph2004 View Post
    When answering the question : "Do you like doing the dishes ?" what's a correct answer ?
    a) "No, I don't mind (it)."
    b) "Yes, I do mind (it)."
    c) "I don't mind (it)."
    The most natural reply is c. The other two has a Yes/No answering to the question "do you like" but then changes focus to minding or not minding.

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    #4

    Re: I don't mind

    The other problem is that you change from "like" to "mind."

    Do you like doing the dishes?
    Like it? Well, not not really, but I don't mind doing them.

    That means I wouldn't choose it as a fun way to spend my free time, but I don't resent the time I have to spend doing it.

    Like it? No, not at all! I can't stand doing them.

    That means that no only would I not choose to do them, but I would prefer anyone else do them instead of me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: I don't mind

    So both "I don't mind" and "I don't mind it" are okay ?

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    #6

    Exclamation Re: I don't mind

    Quote Originally Posted by ph2004 View Post
    So both "I don't mind" and "I don't mind it" are okay ?
    I think your question should be: so both “I do mind" and "I don't mind it" are ok.

    Yes. If you want to express your disapproval empathetically in no uncertain terms ( no, no, not at all I can't stand washing dishes) then, say: Yes, I do mind it.
    Otherwise, if you want to express your reservations about washing dishes but since no one else is present, then say: I don't mind it.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 26-Jan-2010 at 02:39.

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    #7

    Re: I don't mind

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    ok.
    What is wrong with okay?

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    #8

    Exclamation Re: I don't mind

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    What is wrong with okay?
    Nothing. Both are used to express agreement, understanding, acceptance, or the like; You can use any one as per choice.
    You can say: , Okay, I'll get it for you. Or OK, I'll get it for you

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