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    #1

    is/are

    Although there are menial occupations and highly-respected vocations, we cannot say the latter is/are superior to the former.. Although there are many occupations, such as members of parliament, doctors. lawyers, corporate managers, drivers and waiters, every single occupation is indispensable.

    Should I use 'is' or 'are'? Are there any errors in the sentences?

    Thanks in advance.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: is/are

    I would use "are" because "vocations" is plural.

    You could argue that you are referring to a category of occupations, and the single is possible.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. euncu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: is/are

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "vocations" is plural.
    How'd you say this while speaking;

    a) vocations is plural.
    b) vocations is plural. (you make quotation marks in the air while saying vocation)
    c) vocations are plural.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: is/are

    How about "The word 'vocations' is plural."?

    EDIT: Better: The word "vocations" takes the plural from of the verb.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. euncu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: is/are

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    How about "The word 'vocations' is plural."?
    This sound better to me but this give ways to another question?
    When we'd like to say the word "X", isn't X supposed to be in a bare form?
    (Here, I don't mean you're supposed to that way, I'm just saying I'm not sure
    whether it's correct or not)

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: is/are

    Can you explain what you mean by "the bare form"? If you mean without a tense marker if it's a verb or without an S if it's a plural noun, then no. You should use the word exactly as you want to discuss it, whether that's a participle form of a verb or an S for a plural verb or... whatever.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: is/are

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Although there are menial occupations and highly-respected vocations, we cannot say the latter is/are superior to the former.. Although there are many occupations, such as members of parliament, doctors. lawyers, corporate managers, drivers and waiters, every single occupation is indispensable.

    Should I use 'is' or 'are'? Are there any errors in the sentences?

    Thanks in advance.
    Are: 'the latter' refers back to a plural noun phrase 'highly respected vocations'.

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