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    #1

    Complex Subject

    Word formation

    Here is the sentence:

    1)Television has (proven)an important source of production finance.
    The correct answer is proved and I chose it, but I would like to know why "to be" is not used in this case.

    A) Is it the
    Nominative with the Infinitive=Complex Subject?

    It is a pity that in all my grammar books different authors write something like this
    "The linking verbs, appear, prove, and seem are sometimes followed by the infinitive to be and a complement (an adjective or noun). This use of the infinitive is called a predicate infinitive (PI)."

    I always don't like these "often" or "sometimes".

    Could you look for an example of using prove like in my sentence without to in a good grammar book.

    It's very important for me, but I can't find any example of using prove without to in grammar books.

    Thanks in advance!

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    #2

    Re: Complex Subject

    Help me, please


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #3

    Re: Complex Subject

    Zdrastuite rebeata!

    Television has proven(US)/proved(BrE) an important source of production finance.

    has proven/proved = linking verb
    an important source of production finance = predicate nominative (NP)

    Television has proven/proved to be an important source of production finance.

    has proven/proved = V
    to be an important source of production finance = Od
    to be = linking verb
    an important source of prod. fin. = pred. nom.

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    #4

    Re: Complex Subject

    Thanks a lot!
    The point is that I can't find any examples of using "prove" without to be in goog grammar books)

    By the way, do you know Russian?

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    #5

    Re: Complex Subject

    What does od mean?


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #6

    Re: Complex Subject

    Quote Originally Posted by usignolo View Post
    Thanks a lot!
    The point is that I can't find any examples of using "prove" without to be in goog grammar books)
    Quote Originally Posted by usignolo View Post
    By the way, do you know Russian?
    prove - Definition of prove verb (SHOW) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

    Ja nie govoriu po Russki.

    Od = direct object

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    #7

    Re: Complex Subject

    Quote Originally Posted by usignolo View Post
    Thanks a lot!
    The point is that I can't find any examples of using "prove" without to be in goog grammar books)
    The predicate infinitive 'to be' after 'prove' can normally be omitted where it is complemented by either a noun or an adjective, but not when complemented by an adverbial, hence

    This has proved an invaluable source of information.
    (= This has proved to be an invaluable source of information.)

    He has proved useful to us in the past.
    (= He has proved to be useful to us in the past.)

    They have proved to be up to the task on every occasion.
    (but not *They have proved up to the task...)

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