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    #1

    I shall and I will

    Would someone kindly explain to me when, in the future tense, is "I shall" most commonly used, as opposed to "I will"?

    (Also, do not hesitate to correct any of my eventual grammar or spelling mistakes!)

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    #2

    Re: I shall and I will

    It's not more commonly used. It's very rarely used in modern English as a future tense. You can find it in the Bible.
    Not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: I shall and I will

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    It's not more commonly used. It's very rarely used in modern English as a future tense. You can find it in the Bible.
    Not a teacher.
    Although "shall" is much less frequently used than "will" to talk about the future, it is used to ask questions "Shall I make some tea?", for example

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    #4

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    #5

    Re: I shall and I will

    This is a very interesting article, thank you. I have a question on this matter:
    Shall in protasis

    Should (and in archaic usage, shall) can be used in the protasis in the conditional mood (and by extension, similar phrases, such as those beginning with "who" or "so long as"):

    • If you should require assistance, please just ask
    • The prize should be given to whoever shall have done the best


    When do I use it? What's the difference between:
    If you should require assistance, please just ask.
    and
    If you require assistance, please just ask.

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    #6

    Re: I shall and I will

    May I have the easy one?

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    What's the difference between:
    If you should require assistance, please just ask.
    and
    If you require assistance, please just ask.
    Practically speaking, there is no difference.


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    #7

    Re: I shall and I will

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    May I have the easy one?


    Practically speaking, there is no difference.
    But would you say that the first one ("should") sounds too pompous and is best avoided?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I shall and I will

    Quote Originally Posted by vanity View Post
    But would you say that the first one ("should") sounds too pompous and is best avoided?
    No, it sounds polite and thoughtful.

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    #9

    Smile Re: I shall and I will

    Quote Originally Posted by vanity View Post
    But would you say that the first one ("should") sounds too pompous and is best avoided?
    Hello Vanity,

    I reckon 'shall' is a little old-fashioned nowadays. Sometimes people use it for sugestion or advice but now English persons do not use it. The purpose of your quote it's to know if there is a difference between the both ones.

    I think shall is desappearing of the English vocabulary, but I am not a teacher just a French learner.

    Cordially,

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    #10

    Re: I shall and I will

    Quote Originally Posted by vanity View Post
    Would someone kindly explain to me when, in the future tense, is "I shall" most commonly used, as opposed to "I will"?

    (Also, do not hesitate to correct any of my eventual grammar or spelling mistakes!)
    ***NOT A TEACHER***vanity, here in the States, almost everyone uses "will" for future. "Shall" is used usually only in questions (Shall we dance? Shall I open the door?) and perhaps in threats (Oh, yeah? We shall see about that!!!). The famous Henry Fowler said that the only persons who could use "shall" correctly were those born in a certain social class ("to the manner born"). A few (very few) Americans try to maintain the difference between the "shall" showing future ("I shall be in my office at 9 a.m. as usual every day") and the "will" showing determination ("Don't worry. I will be in my office waiting for you at 11 p.m. as I promised"). Although I was certainly NOT to the manner born, I try to maintain this distinction. I do not, however, have the courage to say, "I shan't." Thank you.

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