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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Lightbulb Work out

    Hi,

    We work out a puzzle, what else can we work out?

    Where can we use "work out"?

    Thanks

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Work out

    I would say figure out rather than work out. So perhaps you can use it where figure out would be used.


  3. anupumh's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Work out

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I would say figure out rather than work out. So perhaps you can use it where figure out would be used.

    You mean to say that over here it would be better to use, figure out.. We figure out a puzzle out...

    I wanted to ask where else can this phrase work out be used in similar contexts??

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Work out

    I think you could use it with math problems.


  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Work out

    If you have a sliver of wood in your hand, you have to try to work it out.
    If something is difficult to read, you might say "work it out" (but more likely is "make it out").
    You can work out a knot in your muscle.
    If you have a drawstring that slips inside the hole (like sweat pants), trying to work the end back out is a chore.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. anupumh's Avatar
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    #6

    Exclamation Re: Work out

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If you have a sliver of wood in your hand, you have to try to work it out.
    If something is difficult to read, you might say "work it out" (but more likely is "make it out").
    You can work out a knot in your muscle.
    If you have a drawstring that slips inside the hole (like sweat pants), trying to work the end back out is a chore.
    Thanks

    But I am specifically looking for the usage of "work out" in different contexts.

    Work it out I think is slightly different.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Work out

    Come here so I can work out that sliver.
    I can't work out what it says.
    I've been rubbing and rubbing, but I can't work out that knot from between your shoulders.
    You'll need to work out the end piece of that drawstring and then tie a bigger knot.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: Work out

    'To work out' can also mean 'to exercise physically in order to get in shape'.
    I used to work out every morning, when I was younger.

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    #9

    Re: Work out

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If you have a sliver of wood in your hand, you have to try to work it out.
    Why do I have to work out a sliver of wood? What does it mean?

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Work out

    When you were a child and playing on a wooden surface, did you never get a tiny piece of wood embedded in your hand? It would go in like the tip of a needle, but not leave enough sticking out to pull it out? So your mother would pull out a needle and a pair of tweezers and... (ugh, I hated that!)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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