Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 66
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    get under one's feet

    What does 'get under one's feet' mean? "I hope you're not gonna be getting under our feet this time, we have dinner to prepare."

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 18,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: get under one's feet

    Get in our way -- interfere with our actions.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: get under one's feet

    (Not a teacher)

    Be annoying; be a nuisance; be in the way.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 66
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: get under one's feet

    I assume it's used in both BrE and AmE? I suppose anybody speaking BrE or AmE (or even AusE?) will easily understand it?


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: get under one's feet

    Quote Originally Posted by vredes View Post
    I assume it's used in both BrE and AmE? I suppose anybody speaking BrE or AmE (or even AusE?) will easily understand it?
    I've never actually heard the expression used, so I wouldn't say it is very common. But even so, I would have assumed it meant being in the way.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: get under one's feet

    Often heard in kitchens when children get in their mother's way as she is cooking" Oh do get out from under my feet! You are being so tiresome. Go and find something to do outside!"


    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 4
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: get under one's feet

    [I am not a teacher of English, but am a native (American) English speaker for the past 61 years.]
    This expression means to interfere with a task that another person is trying to do, with no intent to interfere and possibly with an intent to help. Example: When trying to do a task, such as standing to cut food items for a meal, small children or pet animals may literally get under your feet (and get stepped on), which interferes with the task.

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] sweep sb off their feet
    By thedaffodils in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22-Jan-2009, 03:35
  2. have webbed feet
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-May-2008, 03:08
  3. He got to his feet.
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-May-2008, 07:49
  4. He got to his feet.
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-Feb-2008, 20:12
  5. Foot / Feet
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2004, 11:04

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •