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Thread: Interjection

  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Interjection

    How does one handle the interjection in terms of sentence structure. If I use an interjection of one word, is this a proper use of English. Does it count as a grammatical sentence? Is it a fragment? Must it always be followed by a comma and linked to a sentence to be grammatically correct. For example, in the sentence, he loved the wilderness. If I want to follow it with a Yes! for emphasis, does the Yes! standing alone create a fragment or sentence. Is it grammatically?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Interjection

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Nevsky View Post
    How does one handle the interjection in terms of sentence structure. If I use an interjection of one word, is this a proper use of English. Does it count as a grammatical sentence? Is it a fragment? Must it always be followed by a comma and linked to a sentence to be grammatically correct. For example, in the sentence, he loved the wilderness. If I want to follow it with a Yes! for emphasis, does the Yes! standing alone create a fragment or sentence. Is it grammatically?
    It's certainly possible to do, it depends on the wider context, what comes before and what you are going to write after it.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #3

    Re: Interjection

    It doesn't constitute a full sentence in the traditional definition, so it's a fragment, though you could call it a minor sentence if you prefer.

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