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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    He admits to having been lying or he admits to have been lying?

    Why is it correct to write he admits to having been lying, but not he admits to have been lying? (Perhaps the context is relevant.)

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He admits to having been lying or he admits to have been lying?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spamous View Post
    Why is it correct to write he admits to having been lying, but not he admits to have been lying? (Perhaps the context is relevant.)
    You admit to a noun (falsehood, bad faith, unreliability, untruthfulness, inaccuracy...). You can replace the noun with a gerund: 'he admits to being economical with the truth'.

    But it's more likely that an everyday speaker wouldn't use a gerund, but would just say 'he admits that he lied' (or, depending on context, 'he admitted that he'd lied'.

    b

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: He admits to having been lying or he admits to have been lying?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spamous View Post
    Why is it correct to write he admits to having been lying, but not he admits to have been lying? (Perhaps the context is relevant.)
    As Bob says, you need a noun or gerund.
    All of these use a gerund and are correct:
    1. He admits to lying.
    2. He admits to having lied.
    3. He admits to having been lying.

    While 3. is correct, it wouldn't be used often. But since you want a progressive form in the past, you could say 3, or 4.
    3. He admits that he had been lying.

    Your other form, "*he admits to have been lying" is wrong because of the requirements of: admit to, confess to.

    With some verbs you can use this structure:
    He pretends to have been lying.
    He claims to have been lying.
    In these cases, we can't use the form of sentence 1. *He pretends to lying, so we can't use 2 or 3 either.

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