Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #1

    Is the sentence correct?

    1. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is the highest paid head of government, more than five times the remuneration of US president Barack Obama.

    2. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, whose remuneration is more than five times that of US president Barack Obama, is the highest paid head of government.

    Is there anything wrong with the first sentence, especially the part in bold? I think the second sentence is fine.

    Thanks in advance.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #2

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    1. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is the highest paid head of government, more than five times the remuneration of US president Barack Obama.

    2. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, whose remuneration is more than five times that of US president Barack Obama, is the highest paid head of government.

    Is there anything wrong with the first sentence, especially the part in bold? I think the second sentence is fine.

    Thanks in advance.
    #1 involves a nominative absolute construction.
    #2 applies a non-reduced relative clause.

    In my humble opinion, both sentences are equally okay.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #3

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    1. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is the highest-paid head of government, receiving more than five times the remuneration of US President Barack Obama.

    2. Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, whose remuneration is more than five times that of US President Barack Obama, is the highest-paid head of government.

    Thanks in advance.
    2006

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #4

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Hi 2006

    Many thanks for pointing out the error in the first sentence and the missing capital P in president.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #5

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Hi 2006

    Many thanks for pointing out the error in the first sentence and the missing capital P in president.
    You're welcome. Also notice that "highest-paid" requires a hyphen, as it is a compound adjective.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #6

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Hi 2006

    I agree with you.

    You are indeed very helpful.

    Many thanks

    With warmest wishes

    Elaine


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #7

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    You're welcome. Also notice that "highest-paid" requires a hyphen, as it is a compound adjective.
    It is untrue that all compound adjectives are to be hyphenated.

    "highest paid" - NYTimes.com Search

    http://search.bbc.co.uk/search?q=%22...pe=all&start=2

    Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is the highest-paid head of government, (with) more than five times the remuneration of US President Barack Obama.

    EDIT:
    The following compound adjectives are not normally hyphenated:
    Where there is no risk of ambiguity:
    "a Sunday morning walk"
    Left-hand components of a compound adjective that end in -ly that modify right-hand components that are past participles (ending in -ed):
    "a hotly disputed subject"
    "a greatly improved scheme"
    "a distantly related celebrity"
    Compound adjectives that include comparatives and superlatives with more, most, less or least:
    "a more recent development"
    "the most respected member"
    "a less opportune moment"
    "the least expected event"
    Ordinarily hyphenated compounds with intensive adverbs in front of adjectives:
    "very much admired classicist"
    "really well accepted proposal"

    http://able2know.org/topic/140980-1
    Last edited by Kondorosi; 04-Feb-2010 at 07:11.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #8

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    It is untrue that all compound adjectives are to be hyphenated. They should be.

    "highest paid" - NYTimes.com Search

    If you look at all 3 pages of the above search, you will find that the hyphenated form outnumbers the unhyphenated form by at least 3 to 1, even though you searched the unhyphenated form.

    It should be hyphenated. The emphasis is not individually on 'highest' and on 'paid' head of government. The meaning is the 'higest-paid' head of government.

    In other words, the two words are not independent consecutive adjectives; they combine to from a single compound adjective.


    Our Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is the highest-paid head of government, (with) more than five times the remuneration of US President Barack Obama. I agree.

    The beolw
    EDIT:
    The following compound adjectives are not normally hyphenated:
    Where there is no risk of ambiguity:
    "a Sunday morning walk" But it is both a Sunday walk and a morning walk.


    The below are examples of 'adverb (or two), adjective, noun'. They are not compound adjectives and they are not hyphenated.

    Left-hand components of a compound adjective that end in -ly that modify right-hand components that are past participles (ending in -ed):
    "a hotly disputed subject"
    "a greatly improved scheme"
    "a distantly related celebrity"
    Compound adjectives that include comparatives and superlatives with more, most, less or least:
    "a more recent development"
    "the most respected member"
    "a less opportune moment"
    "the least expected event"
    Ordinarily hyphenated compounds with intensive adverbs in front of adjectives:
    "very much admired classicist"
    "really well accepted proposal"
    2006
    Last edited by 2006; 04-Feb-2010 at 07:43.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #9

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    We have three types of compounds: open compounds (e.g. Central American Integration System), closed compounds (goldfish), and hyphenated compounds (well-written).
    This is what Texas Law Review Manual of Style says about using the hyphen to create a compound word:
    When two or more words are combined to form a modifier immediately preceding a noun, join the words by hyphens if doing so will significantly aid the reader in recognizing the compound adjective. One way to decide if a hyphen is necessary is to see if the phrase might be ambiguous without it.
    the highest [paid members]
    The tallest [paid members]
    the [highest paid] members

    No ambiguity, no hyphen. However, this is not always true. Exceptions exist to give us hell.

    Did you follow the wording of the Texas-law quote properly? It makes mention of compound words; it makes no mention of the word classes of the constituent words in a compound. The necessary and sufficient criterion for a compound to qualify as a compound adjective is that it modifies a noun. Concomitant with the criterion is the fact that the head of a compound adjective is an adjective. The head adjective can be modified by an adjective that functions as an adverb or an adverb.

    In 'distantly related celebrity,' 'distantly related' modifies a noun, and this is a necessary and sufficient criterion for 'distantly related' to classify as a compound adjective. It means 'distantly related' is indeed an open-compound adjective.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    They are not compound adjectives and they are not hyphenated.
    They are open-compound adjectives.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/s...ds/4938114.stm
    http://search.bbc.co.uk/search?q=%22...pe=all&start=2
    http://search.bbc.co.uk/search?q=%22...pe=all&start=3

    .
    .
    .
    Last edited by Kondorosi; 04-Feb-2010 at 10:28.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #10

    Re: Is the sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    In 'distantly related celebrity,' 'distantly related' modifies a noun, and this is a necessary and sufficient criterion for 'distantly related' to classify as a compound adjective. It means 'distantly related' is indeed an open-compound adjective.

    A compound adjective is formed by two adjectives! "distantly" is an adverb.

    .
    I have nothing more to say to you on this thread.

Similar Threads

  1. help correct my sentence
    By esophea in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2010, 18:23
  2. Is this sentence correct?
    By snade17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 31-Mar-2009, 00:12
  3. Which of the following sentence is correct?
    By brat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-Jul-2008, 10:21
  4. Is the sentence correct?
    By Hanka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Oct-2006, 21:51
  5. grammar
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 20:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •