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    #1

    this simple sentence

    hey, i know that it is annoying but i was just wondering if anyone could help with this simple sentence.

    I find it difficult.

    I - subject
    find - verb
    it -direct object
    difficult - ???


    what function does this adjective phrase have in the sentence?

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    #2

    Re: this simple sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    hey, i know that it is annoying but i was just wondering if anyone could help with this simple sentence.

    I find it difficult.

    I - subject
    find - verb
    it -direct object
    difficult - ???


    what function does this adjective phrase have in the sentence?
    ***NOT a teacher***No, jirikoo, it is NOT annoying. Everyone here LOVES grammar. "Difficult" is an adjective; most books call it an "objective complement" because it "completes" the meaning of the object. If you just say, "I find it," someone might say, "You find it what?" So you complete the object with an adjective (I find it DIFFICULT) or a noun (They elected him PRESIDENT). Or even a prepositional phrase used as an adjective (I found her IN GOOD HEALTH). (My source: Descriptive English Grammar by Homer C. House and Susan E. Harman -- an old but very good grammar book for ordinary people.) Thank you.

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    #3

    Re: this simple sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***NOT a teacher***No, jirikoo, it is NOT annoying. Everyone here LOVES grammar. "Difficult" is an adjective; most books call it an "objective complement" because it "completes" the meaning of the object. If you just say, "I find it," someone might say, "You find it what?" So you complete the object with an adjective (I find it DIFFICULT) or a noun (They elected him PRESIDENT). Or even a prepositional phrase used as an adjective (I found her IN GOOD HEALTH). (My source: Descriptive English Grammar by Homer C. House and Susan E. Harman -- an old but very good grammar book for ordinary people.) Thank you.

    thanks mate, i thought so

    i just wanted to atomize a different sentence, but as i did not want to complicate it, i had rather chosen the above easier one. My original issue was identifying the sentence element that she did not come following the object complementin i found it sad that she did not come

    my deduction thus is that the declarative content clause (popularly named that-clause) is in the position of adjective complement, or else it is of course a part of the object complement sad that she did not come. It quite diverts from the common postulate that these kinds of clause can be found in the subject-complement or direct-object functions.

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    #4

    Re: this simple sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    thanks mate, i thought so

    i just wanted to atomize a different sentence, but as i did not want to complicate it, i had rather chosen the above easier one. My original issue was identifying the sentence element that she did not come following the object complementin i found it sad that she did not come

    my deduction thus is that the declarative content clause (popularly named that-clause) is in the position of adjective complement, or else it is of course a part of the object complement sad that she did not come. It quite diverts from the common postulate that these kinds of clause can be found in the subject-complement or direct-object functions.
    ***NOT a teacher***Great question. House and Harman's book explains your sentence this way: (1) "that she did not come" is a noun clause. (2) It explains "it." (3) In grammatical terms, it is a noun clause in apposition with "it." (4) So your sentence means: I found it (that she did not come) sad.

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