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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    "You're my bestest friend!"

    Hello,
    I read and heard similar sentences several times.
    Usually it's:
    good - better - best

    However, I found a site that writes there are super super-latives.
    Urban Dictionary: bestest
    Is this something like slang or is it even common?
    To be honest, I like bestest
    Maybe it's common for commercials.

    Cheers!


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #2

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Its wrong; perhaps what a child would say.

    An adult might say it to be "cute". Informal only.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    I do use it, but only deliberately and not because I don't know that it's not a real word.

    If I shoot someone an e-mail with a question and they answer back right away, I might write back, "Thank you! You are the bestest!" but it's just to be fun and I wouldn't do it with someone I didn't consider to be a friend as well as a colleague.

    For example, I would never be in a meeting and say "I think John put forth the bestest plan."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Thanks guys!
    You're the bestest

    Cheers!

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    #5

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello,
    I read and heard similar sentences several times.
    Usually it's:
    good - better - best

    However, I found a site that writes there are super super-latives.
    Urban Dictionary: bestest
    Is this something like slang or is it even common?
    To be honest, I like bestest
    Maybe it's common for commercials.

    Cheers!
    ***NOT a teacher***good afternoon, Nightmare85. In case you don't already know it, there is another slang word in the United States: baddest. But usually it does NOT mean "bad." It means the "best." For example: He is the baddest dude at school. = He's the "coolest guy." Thank you.


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #6

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Thanks guys!
    You're the bestest

    Cheers!
    [groan ]

    Singing "Bad Bad Leroy Brown...."

  4. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    In case you don't already know it, there is another slang word in the United States: baddest. But usually it does NOT mean "bad." It means the "best." For example: He is the baddest dude at school. = He's the "coolest guy." Thank you.
    Wow, are you a visionary?
    I wanted to create a thread about the word "baddest".
    Around 5 years ago I saw this cover, and I've always asked myself:
    http://www.covergalaxy.com/forum/att...iden-black.jpg
    (In case you don't want to click the game cover:)
    Experience Ryu Hayabusa's deadly artistry in Ninja Gaiden Black, the biggest, baddest, fastest and newest installment in the critically acclaimed Ninja Gaiden series.
    Now I finally know its meaning.
    Thanks

    Just a question, shouldn't there be a comma between "fastest and newest"?
    (fastest, and newest)
    I thought we usually put a comma in English before an "and" when we list features, or anything else.

    Cheers!


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #8

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    good - positive
    better - comparative
    the best - superlative


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #9

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Just a question, shouldn't there be a comma between "fastest and newest"?
    (fastest, and newest)
    I thought we usually put a comma in English before an "and" when we list features, or anything else.
    You actually drop the comma before the "and".

    For example, "a, b, c and d". If its only a list of two items, as in "a and b", you don't have a comma at all.


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
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    #10

    Re: "You're my bestest friend!"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***NOT a teacher***good afternoon, Nightmare85. In case you don't already know it, there is another slang word in the United States: baddest. But usually it does NOT mean "bad." It means the "best." For example: He is the baddest dude at school. = He's the "coolest guy." Thank you.
    (Not a teacher)

    The tendency in English (mostly American English, which sometimes then trickles into other regions) seems to be to use negative words positively. I find it amusing. Some words which mean 'cool', 'good' etc:

    Phat (fat)
    Ill
    Sick
    Bad
    Messed up

    I mean, if someone told me "That guy is one phat, ill, sick, and messed up guy", I would think to reply, "poor guy. I hope he gets better."

    Also, about putting a comma before 'and' in a list of items or not - either is acceptable, and it is just personal preference. I just do it for consistency.

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