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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    being

    Hi

    How to use being in a sentence?
    please help me.


    thanx.

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: being

    Hi,
    I'm not a teacher.
    Being = to be.

    I like to be cool.
    I like being cool.


    You've never stopped to be smart and you will never stop to be smart.
    You've never stopped being smart and you will never stop being smart.

    It depends on your taste which one you choose.
    (Either to be or being.)
    Both should be fully right!

    Edit
    Please don't use the word "thanx".
    It's not proper English.

    Thanks!

    Cheers!
    Last edited by Nightmare85; 06-Feb-2010 at 16:10.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hi,

    You've never stopped to be smart and you will never stop to be smart.
    You've never stopped being smart and you will never stop being smart.




    Cheers!
    Think about this, "to stop to smoke" has a different meaning to "to stop smoking"


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    #4

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Being = to be
    In what respect?

  4. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: being

    I don't know what you both want.

    Maybe there are some exceptions (1 of 100), but it's the rule anyway.
    Instead of using to + verb, you can use the gerund.
    (Probably not always, but the examples I gave should be fully right.)

    By the way, you still have not answered the main question.
    (Don't focus on me, focus on it )

    Cheers!

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I don't know what you both want.

    Maybe there are some exceptions (1 of 100), but it's the rule anyway.
    Instead of using to + verb, you can use the gerund.
    (Probably not always, but the examples I gave should be fully right.)

    By the way, you still have not answered the main question.
    (Don't focus on me, focus on it )

    Cheers!
    There are many more exceptions than 1 in 100. The examples you gave are "fully" wrong. There are many verbs after which you cannot use the "to infinitive", there are some where you can use it, but with a different meaning, and there are others which can be followed by either the "to infinitive" or the form with -ing.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The examples you gave are "fully" wrong.
    Sure...
    Some more details would be nice, but I doubt I will get them...

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Sure...
    Some more details would be nice, but I doubt I will get them...
    You've never stopped to be smart and you will never stop to be smart.
    This suggests, albeit badly punctuated, that you have never stopped what you are doing in order to become smart.
    Why should you doubt without reason to do so?

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    #9

    Re: being

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I don't know what you both want.

    Maybe there are some exceptions (1 of 100), but it's the rule anyway.
    Instead of using to + verb, you can use the gerund.
    (Probably not always, but the examples I gave should be fully right.)

    By the way, you still have not answered the main question.
    (Don't focus on me, focus on it )

    Cheers!
    ***NOT a teacher***Nightmare85, good morning. (1) Yes, the gerund/infinitive matter is very confusing. (2) Some books and Web articles can really help you. (3) I stopped to eat ice cream. = I was working. At ll:30 a.m., I stopped. I ate ice cream. At 11: 34, I started to work/working again. / I stopped eating ice cream about one year ago. = I no longer eat ice cream. (P.S. That's true! ) (4) I tried closing the window, but that didn't help. = I DID close the window, but I STILL felt cold. (5) I tried to close the window, but I couldn't. The window would not move. (6) Some verbs take only the infinitive; some take only the gerund; and others take both, but sometimes they have different meanings!!!I don't know why some people say English is easy. It isn't. Have a nice day!

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    #10

    Re: being

    Goka, you can use being in such a sentence, too:
    The user was banned for being a troll.
    I got money for being good in school.

    In these example sentences you cannot use to be.
    So remember: after for you have to use the gerund.

    There are plenty of other examples:
    He got a gift for working hard.
    (etc.)

    Cheers!

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