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    #1

    a few connotations of "dismiss"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    We have to dismiss our servant for being dishonest.

    The new austerity policy of the government caused a number of clerk to be dismissed.

    My Finn informed me that Gatsby had dismissed every servant in his house a week ago.

    They were dismissed for laziness.

    Several senior officiers from the Greek army were dismissed from office by the government.

    They were dismissed as incompetent.

    He was dismissed from his job.

    I was dismissed for being late.

    dismiss = remove from office or employment

    For God's sake let me dismiss the guests!

    dismiss = disband; let go

    We have to dismiss the assembly.

    dismiss = adjourn

    I dismissed the taxi.

    dismiss = free

    Sometimes a fall from the summit of awful precipices has dismissed (?) them from the anguish of perplexity by dismissing (??) them at once from life.

    dismiss (?) = release

    dismiss (??) = deprive

    I dismissed him from my mind.

    He, smiling, said, "Dismiss your fear"

    dismiss = forget

    Mr Wakeham dismissed the report as speculation.

    He has to dismiss the information as incorrect.

    dismiss = disregard

    The low-court dismissed the accused.

    dismiss = to set at liberty

    The bowler dismissed the next batsman for six runs.

    dismiss = eliminate

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: a few connotations of "dismiss"

    Hi V,
    I am not sure if you required any feedback on the completed sentences..if so here are my thoughts. If in fact you didn't write the sentences but only interpreted them , ignore my comments !

    The ways that you have used 'dismiss' are excellent. I would just like to make a couple of points..
    "For God's sake, let me dismiss the guests." In this context, 'dismiss' usually has an overtone of authority. I'd expect to read 'let me dismiss the troops' or
    'let me dismiss the pupils'. In other words, the speaker has a position of some degree of power over those to be dismissed. With guests that would sound strange and it might be more correct to have it phrased as "let me send the guests away".

    The other thing that sounded odd wasn't connected with 'dismiss' but your use of 'low-court'. I don't know if you are using British English or American English.I don't know the terminology for US courts but in the British judicial system we have ' High Court' for serious crime and 'Magistrate Court', which is only empowered to give lesser sentences ( I think up to 2 years in prison). I'd guess that in this instance you possibly mean the Magistrate Court.

    Hope this helps J.
    Last edited by Hollandhaggis; 06-Feb-2010 at 22:35. Reason: second thoughts on what was being asked !

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    #3

    Re: a few connotations of "dismiss"

    To dismiss a court case is to end it in favor of the defendant. (The person might be on bail, so it doesn't necessarily mean to set free.)

    The last one is about cricket, and I am unfamiliar with that game.


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    #4

    Exclamation Re: a few connotations of "dismiss"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    They were dismissed as incompetent.

    He was dismissed from his job.

    I was dismissed for being late.

    dismiss = remove from office or employment

    I think, ‘dismissed as incompetent’ is not a proper expression for removal from a job. You can say:
    They were dismissed for incompetence
    This type of expression is normally used by law courts to reject a time-barred application for review/appeal; as:
    The application was finally lodged with the Federal Court out-of-time and was dismissed as incompetent

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