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  1. indonesia's Avatar
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    #1

    difference between

    Is there a difference between a participle clause and a participle phrase?
    If so, could someone attempt to explain it for me, please.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

  3. indonesia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: difference between

    Thanks Ron,

    Though I'm still a little confused

    Is it just the positioning on the clause/phrase that determines what it is?

    Can a participle phrase head a sentence like the clauses given in the links provided? and vice-versa?

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    #4

    Re: difference between

    It's not only positioning- in the clauses link above, you have the following example:
    Used sparingly, this face cream should last you until Christmas.
    You could rewrite is this way:
    This face cream, used sparingly, should last you until Christmas.

    If you move the phrases in the examples in the link above, you will have sentences like 'Releasing its grip, you could see the panther', which really makes no sense.

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    #5

    Re: difference between

    You can think of clauses as "almost sentences". Regular clauses have a finite verb and a subject. Participle clauses don't have a finite verb, but the participle plays its role. I'm not about to go deeper into it, because Polish grammarians' approach seems to differ from English (by the way, I'm not sure if it's alright to say so. English's maybe?), so I don't want to mess it up. That's a bit strange, because our grammars are in fact very similar.

  4. indonesia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: difference between

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It's not only positioning- in the clauses link above, you have the following example:
    Used sparingly, this face cream should last you until Christmas.
    You could rewrite is this way:
    This face cream, used sparingly, should last you until Christmas.

    If you move the phrases in the examples in the link above, you will have sentences like 'Releasing its grip, you could see the panther', which really makes no sense.
    Are we saying that a clause has the ability to be moved about within a sentence, whereas a phrase has a more set location

  5. RonBee's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: difference between

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    I'm not about to go deeper into it, because Polish grammarians' approach seems to differ from English (by the way, I'm not sure if it's alright to say so. English's maybe?), so I don't want to mess it up. That's a bit strange, because our grammars are in fact very similar.
    Well, you compare grammarians to English. You could say, perhaps:
    .
    The approach of Polish grammarians differs from that of English grammarians.
    (I hope that helps.)



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