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    #1

    Proud

    Hello,

    I would like to know if English people often use the word 'proud' in bad meaning. I ask you this question because when I listen the news on the msnbc's web site I listen carefully what the person say, but when they place this word in their sentences it's always to show how they are proud about something like their kids or a winner man or women in sports games.

    Sorry if I am talkative but I am an Iberian guy.

    Thanks for all your replies.


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    #2

    Re: Proud

    I am not sure why you see that usage as having a bad meaning. It seems to me to show that they are proud of something.

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    #3

    Re: Proud

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I am not sure why you see that usage as having a bad meaning. It seems to me to show that they are proud of something.

    Hi Anglika,

    What do you thing about this definition from Cambridge Dictionnary:

    'disapproving feeling that you are better and more important than other people'

    Their example is :
    Come on, admit you're wrong and don't be so proud.

    Thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Proud

    Yes, it can go both ways.

    To say "I'm proud of you" is always positive.

    To say "I'm proud of how I did" is an honest happiness with one's performance.

    To say "He is too proud for his own good" means he feels superior. The same with "Don't be so proud."

    Look for the use of "of." Proud OF something is a positive emotion.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Proud

    Hello Barbara,

    Your explanation is very clear like usual. Do you know if Americans often use proud in negative sense.

    Thanks for your reply.

    Sincerely,

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Proud

    We do in things like "He's too proud for his own good."

    In general, I think if I read "She was a proud woman" it would feel vaguely British to me.

    It's hard for me to tell - I read so many British novels growing up that I'm not always sure what sounds odd for most Americans, and after 4 years on ESL forums, I've learned so many British expressions (though I keep learning more!) that I can't remember what would have sounded odd to me years ago.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: Proud

    Good afternoon Barbara,

    I have just read your answer but I am questionning myself about the beginning of your sentence. You write: 'we do in things like' maybe you want to write 'we do things like' it seems to me more right, because you do 'in' the things, it's a little surprising.

    Perhaps I'm wrong but when I read that phase it's stuck me for understand what you like to tell me.

    But it was not not the purpose of my question and I would klike to thank you to have given me your point of view about this subject.

    See you later on the forum.

    The Frenchie learner.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Proud

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Good afternoon Barbara,

    I have just read your answer but I am questionning myself about the beginning of your sentence. You write: 'we do in things like' maybe you want to write 'we do things like' it seems to me more right, because you do 'in' the things, it's a little surprising.

    Perhaps I'm wrong but when I read that phase it's stuck me for understand what you like to tell me.

    But it was not not the purpose of my question and I would klike to thank you to have given me your point of view about this subject.

    See you later on the forum.

    The Frenchie learner.
    Barb's sentence is correct, she is saying 'We (Americans) do (use proud in a negative sense)in things like "He's too proud for his own good."'

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