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    #1

    be/have been

    I wonder if there is any difference between "1" and "2".
    1. There is an accident.
    2. There has been an accident.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: be/have been

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is any difference between "1" and "2".
    1. There is an accident.
    2. There has been an accident.
    #1 doesn't make sense. Can you see why?

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: be/have been

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    #1 doesn't make sense. Can you see why?
    I will try to solve it:
    An accident is just a moment that is probably very short.
    Possible sentences could be:
    There was an accident.
    There will be an accident.


    There has been an accident. ->
    The accident happened in past but still affects the present.
    We're still stuck in our car because of the accident that happened 5 minutes ago.

    However:
    Why can't you say:
    There is an accident every day.

    Cheers!

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: be/have been

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I will try to solve it:
    An accident is just a moment that is probably very short.
    Possible sentences could be:
    There was an accident.
    There will be an accident.

    There has been an accident. ->
    The accident happened in past but still affects the present.
    We're still stuck in our car because of the accident that happened 5 minutes ago.

    However:
    Why can't you say:
    There is an accident every day.

    Cheers!
    You can say "There is an accident every day" but it's an unlikely thing to say, it would be more natural as: "There are accidents every day"

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