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  1. Newbie
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    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #1

    using the word 'being'

    I have no clear idea of using the word being in different circumtances.EX.

    "volume is directly propotional to the pressure,temperature being remained constant"

    In this case can you please analyse the grammar used in this sentence.
    why don't they use "while temperature being remained constant" ?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: using the word 'being'

    Quote Originally Posted by kalit View Post
    I have no clear idea of using the word being in different circumtances.EX.

    "volume is directly propotional to the pressure,temperature being remained constant"

    In this case can you please analyse the grammar used in this sentence.
    why don't they use "while temperature being remained constant" ?
    The sentence is not grammatical - that is possibly what's confusing you. You can't say "being remained". Where did you find this sentence?
    Volume is directly proportional to pressure, if the temperate remains constant.
    The temperature being constant, the volume
    is directly proportional to pressure.

    Is English really your native language? The sentence is very obviously wrong.

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 6
    #3

    Re: using the word 'being'

    Thank you for your reply.
    I found this sentence in a physics book.
    It says volume is directly propotional to pressure when you control the teperature.
    I like if you explain why it is wrong.

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      • India
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    #4

    Exclamation Re: using the word 'being'

    Quote Originally Posted by kalit View Post
    Thank you for your reply.
    I found this sentence in a physics book.
    It says volume is directly propotional to pressure when you control the teperature.
    I like if you explain why it is wrong.
    being’ is the present participle form of the verb ‘to be’. However, ‘to be’ is better known as a linking and existential verb. It is rarely used to form sentence in continuous tense but like present participle of other verbs, it can be used as adjective, participle phrase, gerund and gerund phrase and above all to form passive construction in present continuous tense. See the following examples:

    The temperature being constant, the volume is directly proportional to pressure.(as adjective modifying the noun ‘constant’) This is a modified version of your example sentence after the wrongly placed verb ‘remained’ has been removed.

    Being price sensitive, the capital values are expected to remain stable.(underlined expression is a participle phrase)

    Denise Van Outen says, she is disappointed after being axed from BBC talent show. (Gerund phrase)

    What is being done to curb gambling right at the doorsteps? (passive sentence in present continuoue)

    In your example sentence, the expression “temperature being remained constant”, is neither a phrase nor a clause structurally correct for which Raymott termed it as not grammatical.If you have seen the sentence in the very form in your physics book please do correct it.

  4. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 6
    #5

    Re: using the word 'being'

    Thank you for the clarifications.I like more people would participate and express their openions.

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