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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Don't mind if i do

    Hello. I am from Denmark and study teaching.
    When offering someone a treat or a gift I sometimes hear the phrase "Don't mind if i do" as a pendant to "Yes please". Typically if the offer is expressed as at single word question (ex. "Coffee?" )

    My first assumption was that it was supposed to be the answer to the full question "Do you want coffee?" - "please don't mind if I do want" That is that the person accepting the offer really ought not to do so if all rules of politeness was to be followed.

    However i sometimes hear it as "I don't mind if I do" which pretty much kills my theory

    Can anybody tell me who is not supposed to mind what.

  2. buggles's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 3,987
    #2

    Re: Don't mind if i do

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Hello. I am from Denmark and study teaching.
    When offering someone a treat or a gift I sometimes hear the phrase "Don't mind if i do" as a pendant to "Yes please". Typically if the offer is expressed as at single word question (ex. "Coffee?" )

    My first assumption was that it was supposed to be the answer to the full question "Do you want coffee?" - "please don't mind if I do want" That is that the person accepting the offer really ought not to do so if all rules of politeness was to be followed.

    However i sometimes hear it as "I don't mind if I do" which pretty much kills my theory

    Can anybody tell me who is not supposed to mind what.
    Bear in mind, most native speakers merely absorb the language as they grow up. "(I) don't mind if I do" merely says, "Yes, please". It's neither formal nor informal: it's just a stock response, given without thought. You'll also come across,

    "Coffee?"
    "You betcha!"

    This is short for "You bet your life!" and it's a more enthusiastic response than, "Don't mind if I do", but it also only means "Yes, please".

    There's so many ways of saying "Yes, please" it would take too long to list them, but watch out for.....


    "Coffee?"

    "Cool!" (and this doesn't mean they want a cup of cool coffe!)
    "Terrific!"
    "Great!"
    "Go on, then"
    "OK"
    "(I'd) love some!"
    "Well, if you're making some........"

    buggles (not a teacher)

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