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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 575
    #1

    of/comma

    I saw the next sentences in Cambridge dictionary.
    1. Do you have any experience of working with kids?
    2. Do you have any experience working with kids?

    I would like to know the meaning of "of(1)".
    I wonder why "of" can be omitted.

    * I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning among 3 sentences.
    3. He has a lot of experience (of) working with kids.
    4. He has a lot of experience, working with kids.
    5. Working with kids, he has a lot of experience.

  1. Eric Davis's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 86
    #2

    Re: of/comma

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I saw the next sentences in Cambridge dictionary.
    1. Do you have any experience of working with kids?
    2. Do you have any experience working with kids?

    I would like to know the meaning of "of(1)".
    I wonder why "of" can be omitted.

    * I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning among 3 sentences.
    3. He has a lot of experience (of) working with kids.
    4. He has a lot of experience, working with kids.
    5. Working with kids, he has a lot of experience.
    Hey, I'm not a teacher, but I would like to answer your questions...

    In (3) "...of working with kids" is a prepositional phrase that modifies the noun "experience."

    In (4)"...,working with kids" is a participle phrase that modifies "He."

    In (5)"Working with kids.." is also a participle phrase that modifies "he."

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