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    #1

    to become/to get

    Hello!

    I would like to know, please, if I could say either:

    " I became excited" or:
    " I got excited".

    I suspect they could have a slighty different meaning; but I also suspect that if both sentences are correct they have almost the same real meaning.
    I wonder if we can use both structures or verbs with any adjetive.
    If not, could you give me any clue to know when should I use the former and when the latter?.

    Thank you very much in advance!.
    Regards.

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    #2

    Re: to become/to get

    Yes, "get" is often used in the sense of "become". As far as I know it can be used with the same range of adjectives, and without any real difference in meaning. However it is much more colloquial. This means it is more common in spoken English (I would normally use it in sentences like this, when speaking); on the other hand, in formal written English, the verb "get" is generally stigmatized and it is often better to avoid it.

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    #3

    Re: to become/to get

    Quote Originally Posted by orangutan View Post
    Yes, "get" is often used in the sense of "become". As far as I know it can be used with the same range of adjectives, and without any real difference in meaning. However it is much more colloquial. This means it is more common in spoken English (I would normally use it in sentences like this, when speaking); on the other hand, in formal written English, the verb "get" is generally stigmatized and it is often better to avoid it.
    Thank you very much Orangutan, for your clear and speedy response.
    There are some adjetives that I am used to see only with one of those verbs. For example:

    "I got tired".
    "She became rich".

    So could we also say " I became tired" and " She got rich"(though, this one, in a spoken English as you say)?.

    Thank you very much again.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to become/to get

    Quote Originally Posted by for learning View Post
    Thank you very much Orangutan, for your clear and speedy response.
    There are some adjetives that I am used to see only with one of those verbs. For example:

    "I got tired".
    "She became rich".

    So could we also say " I became tired" and " She got rich"(though, this one, in a spoken English as you say)?.

    Thank you very much again.
    Yes, you could say or write "I became tired" and say "She got rich".

    • Member Info
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    #5

    Re: to become/to get

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, you could say or write "I became tired" and say "She got rich".
    Thank you very much bhaisahab!(and orangutan).

    Regards.

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