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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Idioms Usage

    Hi Guys ,

    Why is evidence that used in below sentence correct? Is n't it an unidiomatic to write evidence that instead of evidence of

    1.Astronomers have uncovered evidence that a star that a star as bright as the full moon exploded into view 340,000 years ago, emitting dazzling radiation that could have disrupted Earth's protective ozone layer and sunburned our Stone Age ancestors?

    If I can use evidence that in above sentence why the use of chance that in below sentence unidiomatic and should be chance to or chance of

    2.Adult survivors of child abuse traditionally have had little or no chance that they could get their symptoms recognized and treated.

    Is there a grammatical rule to figure out when the idioms are to be used and when the normal forms can be used.

    Idioms are really driving me crazy Pleassee help me out.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Idioms Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Anial View Post
    Hi Guys ,

    Why is evidence that used in below sentence correct? Is n't it an unidiomatic to write evidence that instead of evidence of
    There are no idioms here.
    It's a straight forward case of a normal noun followed by either a normal subordinate clause or a normal prepositional phrase.

    1.Astronomers have uncovered evidence that a star that a star as bright as the full moon exploded into view 340,000 years ago, emitting dazzling radiation that could have disrupted Earth's protective ozone layer and sunburned our Stone Age ancestors?

    If I can use evidence that in above sentence why the use of chance that in below sentence unidiomatic and should be chance to or chance of
    It's a different grammatical construction.

    2.Adult survivors of child abuse traditionally have had little or no chance that they could get their symptoms recognized and treated.

    Is there a grammatical rule to figure out when the idioms are to be used and when the normal forms can be used.

    Idioms are really driving me crazy Pleassee help me out.
    Well, first, don't think of them as idioms.

    There is evidence that the star is 100 millions of years old.
    There is evidence of a certain star being 100 millions of years old.
    You can't interchange 'that/of' because the sentence structures are different - but it has nothing to do with the word 'evidence'.

    *There is evidence of a star exploded.
    Wrong
    *There is evidence that a star having exploded. Wrong.
    The above sentences can be fixed by switching 'that/of'.

    Adults survivors of child abuse have no chance of being treated.
    Adults survivors of child abuse have no chance that they will be treated. (This is slightly awkward)
    There is no chance that adult survivors of child abuse can be effectively treated.
    Again, you can't interchange these - for the same reason.

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