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  1. nash11
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    #1

    moving on to a next point

    Hi, I would like to know of some ways of starting a new paragraph with a new point.


    E.g. Now, moving on to the technical aspect. [ is this how you write it/use it?]

    As for the technical aspect,....


    Any help would be appreciated! thanks

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    #2

    Re: moving on to a next point

    Quote Originally Posted by nash11 View Post
    Hi, I would like to know of some ways of starting a new paragraph with a new point.


    E.g. Now, moving on to the technical aspect. [ is this how you write it/use it?]

    As for the technical aspect,....


    Any help would be appreciated! thanks
    ***NOT A TEACHER***

    Nash, good morning.

    Are you looking for so-called transitional adverbs?

    Here are some. Please remember that many of them do not have to start the paragraph. In other words, they don't have to be the first word.

    Therefore, hence, however, moreover, nevertheless, on the contrary, consequently, indeed, in fact, further, in brief, at any rate, but, otherwise, still, then.

    Have a nice day!

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: moving on to a next point

    Quote Originally Posted by nash11 View Post
    Hi, I would like to know of some ways of starting a new paragraph with a new point.


    E.g. Now, moving on to the technical aspect. [ is this how you write it/use it?]
    No, you should avoid phrases like "Now I'm going to talk about X".
    or "We will now consider the technical aspects", etc.
    As for the technical aspect,....
    That is an improvement.

    Any help would be appreciated! thanks
    Just a few tips ...
    The best transition is a logical one that doesn't need these signposts. If your text is arranged logically, the reader should understand the flow of your argument.

    Technical aspects present a different problem.

    The stylistic aspects just discussed are more easily dealt with than the technical aspects. These latter are ...

    In an essay or report in which your introduction reads: "This essay will address points A, B and C", you don't need to start a paragraph with: "First, I will talk about A", and you should definitely not write, "Last but not least, we move on to C".

    If it's a technical report rather than an essay, you could consider headings/subheadings.
    3.1.1 Technical Aspects
    Technical aspects present a different problem.

    The best way to get a feel for good paragraph transitions is to read good essays.

    PS: I agree with TheParser's suggestion of using adverbs; and I agree with his leaving out adverbs such: firstly, finally, next, etc.

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