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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    Simple Present sentence

    Hello,
    I have a question about this sentence.
    As far as I know there is a rule where to put several word classes.
    I would like to know if this is okay:

    I tell you every day not to go to this place.

    The sense should be:
    Every day to tell a guy not to go to a several place.

    Now another version:
    I tell you not to go to this place every day.
    To me it sounds like:
    This guy goes every day to a place and you tell him not to do this (because it's too much.)

    Okay, so far it should be good, but I thought every day should be at the end of both sentences, because it's an adverbial phrase.
    Personally I want to express the 1st example
    Would the 1st sentence be completely okay to express the sense how I wrote it?

    About the sentence constructure:
    I thought usually we use:
    Subject - Predicate - Object - ? - Adverbial Phrase.

    As you can see I thought an adverbial phrase which in our case is "every day" should be the end of both sentences.
    And please tell me what the ? is.

    Thank you!

    Cheers!


  2. euncu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Hi, Nightmare85
    I can't help you in grammar part since I'm not good at that, but putting "every day" at the end completely changes the meaning.

    I tell you every day (is what I do every day)
    You go that place every day (is what you do every day)

    So, you can't change the meaning of a sentence just to make it grammatical.
    Maybe, you could use present continuous tense for your second example.

    I tell you every day not to go to that place. (I've told you more than once)

    I'm telling you not to go to that place every day. (Probably, this is the first time for me to tell you not to go)

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Thank you, euncu,
    It makes sense to me.

    However, I would like to see a teacher's opinion, too

    Cheers!

  4. Eric Davis's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 86
    #4

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello,
    I have a question about this sentence.
    As far as I know there is a rule where to put several word classes.
    I would like to know if this is okay:

    I tell you every day not to go to this place.

    The sense should be:
    Every day to tell a guy not to go to a several place.

    Now another version:
    I tell you not to go to this place every day.
    To me it sounds like:
    This guy goes every day to a place and you tell him not to do this (because it's too much.)

    Okay, so far it should be good, but I thought every day should be at the end of both sentences, because it's an adverbial phrase.
    Personally I want to express the 1st example
    Would the 1st sentence be completely okay to express the sense how I wrote it?

    About the sentence constructure:
    I thought usually we use:
    Subject - Predicate - Object - ? - Adverbial Phrase.

    As you can see I thought an adverbial phrase which in our case is "every day" should be the end of both sentences.
    And please tell me what the ? is.

    Thank you!

    Cheers!


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      • Spain
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    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 438
    #5

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello,
    I have a question about this sentence.
    As far as I know there is a rule where to put several word classes.
    I would like to know if this is okay:

    I tell you every day not to go to this place.

    The sense should be:
    Every day to tell a guy not to go to a several place.

    Now another version:
    I tell you not to go to this place every day.
    To me it sounds like:
    This guy goes every day to a place and you tell him not to do this (because it's too much.)

    Okay, so far it should be good, but I thought every day should be at the end of both sentences, because it's an adverbial phrase.
    Personally I want to express the 1st example
    Would the 1st sentence be completely okay to express the sense how I wrote it?

    About the sentence constructure:
    I thought usually we use:
    Subject - Predicate - Object - ? - Adverbial Phrase.

    As you can see I thought an adverbial phrase which in our case is "every day" should be the end of both sentences.
    And please tell me what the ? is.

    Thank you!

    Cheers!

    I really like your questions, sometimes I think you already know the answer in advance and you only try to test us because most of them are really sparkling .
    From my point of view I would suggest the following:
    I tell you not to go to this place
    It is a subordinate sentence where we have a main clause : I tell you
    and the subordinate one: not to go to this place which here is functioning as a direct object.
    Right, now we add a complement of time : every day , depending on where you put it , it will complement the first clause or the second one.
    Therefore, of course, it will give a different meaning to the overall sentence depending on where we put it.

    Correct me if I am wrong . And thank you for your challenging questions.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Would the 1st sentence be completely okay to express the sense how I wrote it?

    Yes. You asked a similar question the other day about adverb placement, and I gathered from that that you understood it.

    As you can see I thought an adverbial phrase which in our case is "every day" should be the end of both sentences.
    And please tell me what the ? is. I don't know, but it's not necessary for understanding adverb placement.
    The adverb generally goes together with the bit that it modifies.
    If it modifies the verb, it can often go at the beginning, at the end, before, or after the verb. So with a verb, or if it modifies the whole sentence, an adverb can go in a lot of places.
    BUT: If it modifies something in the complement (like 'go there'), you have to put the adverb with what it modifies.


    [I] [told] [you] [every day] [not to go there.]
    Subject, verb, indirect object, , adverb, complement.

    [I] [told] [you] [not to go there.][every day]
    Subject, verb, indirect object, complement, adverb.

    [Every day], [I] [told] [you] [not to go there].
    Adverb, subject, verb, indirect object, complement

    You can't put the adverb at the end if it belongs to the verb and there is something else at the end that the adverb could be modifying.

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    #7

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    I really like your questions, sometimes I think you already know the answer in advance and you only try to test us because most of them are really sparkling .
    From my point of view I would suggest the following:
    I tell you not to go to this place
    It is a subordinate sentence where we have a main clause : I tell you
    and the subordinate one: not to go to this place which here is functioning as a direct object.
    Right, now we add a complement of time : every day , depending on where you put it , it will complement the first clause or the second one.
    Therefore, of course, it will give a different meaning to the overall sentence depending on where we put it.

    Correct me if I am wrong . And thank you for your challenging questions.
    I forgot to say that I am neither a teacher nor a native speaker. But I'm afraid you alreaky know.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Simple Present sentence

    Thank you all!

    ratóncolorao, thanks, you make me blush
    Sometimes I want to be sure if I really know it.
    There were some moments when I thought I really know something, but then I saw it was wrong.
    And don't worry, I always check the member type and the native language

    (I hope we'll be able to create a signature, then we will not need to write it every time.)


    Cheers!

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