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  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool to wind one's way

    Given this sentence:

    He wound his way more quickly now back down the stairs and moved close to the kitchen.

    What is the meaning of wound his way?

    I must say that the character is afraid of being catch; he's at a house he's slid in secretly. Wouldn't it be possible he is making furtive movements, zigzagging not to be seen?

    Thank You
    Last edited by Bushwhacker; 28-Feb-2010 at 15:01.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to wind one's way

    It means he did not take a direct route.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: to wind one's way

    I've never heard of someone winding their way forward.

    It seems to be a method of going backwards in a more efficient way.

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    #4

    Re: to wind one's way

    Never mind; now I am reminded of "A Long and Winding Road" by the Beatles.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to wind one's way

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    Given this sentence:

    He wound his way more quickly now back down the stairs and moved close to the kitchen.

    What is the meaning of wound his way?

    I must say that the character is afraid of being catch; he's at a house he's slid in secretly. Wouldn't it be possible he is making furtive movements, zigzagging not to be seen?

    Thank You
    I would guess that he is on some sort of winding staircase, especially if we are talking about the stairs in the "tallhouse" that you asked about the other day, in which case it would be quite normal to wind oneself up or down. Have a look at this picture:
    http://www.radford.edu/~eurotrails/Winding%20Stairs.jpg

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