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  1. Member
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      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Algeria
      • Current Location:
      • Algeria

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 173
    #1

    Smile ask for information

    dear what is the difference between inside in and into
    thank you

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #2

    Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by adel87 View Post
    dear what is the difference between inside in and into
    thank you
    "I am inside something" Je suis dedans quelque chose. "I am going into..." Je vais aller dedans... "I am in the room" Je suis dans la piece.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 02-Mar-2010 at 09:00. Reason: correction

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
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      • Spain
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      • Spain

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 438
    #3

    Re: ask for information

    "Into" preposition of movement.
    Walking into the mine.



    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 3
    #4

    Unhappy Re: ask for information

    hi, dear, what are transitive and intransitive verbs? i am not a teacher i am student of english , thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • New Zealand

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 36
    #5

    Re: ask for information

    What is current policy in teaching English to foreigners (or to natives, for that matter) when there are differences between strictly correct grammar and the kind of slipshod English we see every day in newspapers etc? Three examples: plural antecedent with a singular noun following, e.g. "he is one of those people who likes his own way" (instead of "like their own way"). Confusion between transitive and intransitive forms, e.g. "they sank the enemy ship" (transitive verb "sink" requires the past tense "sunk"), or "lie the baby on its side" instead of "lay". And strong verbs made weak, e.g. "sweared" (swore), "beared" (bore) etc. As for the difference in formal English between "will" and "shall" - don't get me started. Would any teacher of English care to comment?

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