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    #1

    what is the difference?

    Suppose that I have a sentence like this.

    Uncle Tom smokes cigars in the kitchen.

    I want to change this sentence so that it shows annoyance.

    Uncle Tom WILL smoke cigars in the kitchen
    Uncle Tom is always smoking cigars in the kitchen.

    Is there a difference between the two ways?

  1. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: what is the difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by maral55 View Post
    Suppose that I have a sentence like this.

    Uncle Tom smokes cigars in the kitchen.

    I want to change this sentence so that it shows annoyance.

    Uncle Tom WILL smoke cigars in the kitchen
    Uncle Tom is always smoking cigars in the kitchen.

    Is there a difference between the two ways?
    maral, both sentences are simple statements of fact. I don't find 'annoyance' in either sentence!
    I suggest: "Much to my annoyance, Uncle Tom will smoke cigars in the kitchen." "Much to my annoyance, Uncle Tom is always smoking cigars in the kitchen."

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    #3

    Re: what is the difference?

    Present Continuous

    Present continuous can be used to express a habit which happens often, there is often an element of criticism with this structure.

    Example. Pedro always asks questions about the lesson( this is a fact)
    but
    Pedro is always asking questions about the lesson.( This annoys the teacher.)


    Will and would express typical behaviour They describe both pleasant and unpleasant habits.

    Will and Would when decontracted and stressed, express an annoying habit.
    example:
    He WILL come in to the house with his muddy boots on.
    She WOULD make us wash in ice-cold water.


    New headway English course, Student's book.
    Oxford university Press.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: what is the difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by maral55 View Post
    Suppose that I have a sentence like this.

    Uncle Tom smokes cigars in the kitchen.

    I want to change this sentence so that it shows annoyance.

    Uncle Tom WILL smoke cigars in the kitchen
    Uncle Tom is always smoking cigars in the kitchen.

    Is there a difference between the two ways?
    Both could express annoyance when spoken, it depends on the tone of voice used.

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