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  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool He seines the wind

    Has "seine the wind" some dark meaning?

    He seines the wind is what is said by a criminal to someone who is asking for somebody else who seems missing.

    Seine seems to link with fishing in any way ?

    Thanks for the help
    Last edited by Bushwhacker; 10-Mar-2010 at 12:17.

  2. euncu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He seines the wind

    Hi, Bushwhacker.

    A little context would be useful. Without it, I only can guess;

    You can catch fishes with a seine but you can't catch the wind. So what you do is in vain.

  3. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #3

    Cool Re: He seines the wind

    Quote Originally Posted by euncu View Post
    Hi, Bushwhacker.

    A little context would be useful. Without it, I only can guess;

    You can catch fishes with a seine but you can't catch the wind. So what you do is in vain.
    Thanks. Yes, the sentence seems to refer to doing something in vain.

    Just seconds before, the one who seines escapes from being killed by the criminal who says the sentence. Who "seins" is a conspirator faking everyone. The killer has tried to eliminate him as a favour to a lord whom the killer is a friend with. The lord is talking to the faker when this one sensing the try runs away. The Lord asks the killer where the faker is, and it is when the killer says "He seines the wind"

    Maybe is a way to say "chi lo sa", who knows?
    Last edited by Bushwhacker; 10-Mar-2010 at 12:58.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He seines the wind

    This 'seines the wind' may be something to do with 'catch the wind' - a traditional way of talking about someone trying to do something that's impossible. 'There's no point in doing that. It'll never work. You might as well try to catch the wind.'

    Incidentally, you can't use Who as the subject of an indicative sentence - as you would Quien - to refer to 'people who...'. Phrases like 'People who...' , 'Those who...', 'One who...' are among the possibilities - even, rather poetically 'He who...'.

    So: 'The man/one/person who seines...'.

    (Shakespeare did use 'who' in this way; example 'He mocks at scars who never felt a wound'. But it's not current.)

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 11-Mar-2010 at 13:28. Reason: Added 'catch the wind' idea

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