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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Smile omission of starting prepositions

    Dear teachers,

    Is it a good practice to omit the starting preposition, just as the following sentences ?

    1. (After) Three minutes in pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher, injured on the head.

    2. (With) Sword in his hand, he lunged at his adversary.

    This type of ellipsis happens a lot in many articles in newspapers or fictions.
    I am much obliged to you for your guidance.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by kl004535; 11-Mar-2010 at 06:29.

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    #2

    Re: omission of starting prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Is it a good practice to omit the starting preposition, just as the following sentences ? I would keep it in 1.

    1. After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher because of a head injury.

    2. Sword in his hand, he lunged at his adversary.

    Thanks.
    2006

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: omission of starting prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Is it a good practice to omit the starting preposition, just as the following sentences ?

    1. (After) Three minutes in pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher, injured on the head.

    2. (With) Sword in his hand, he lunged at his adversary.

    This type of ellipsis happens a lot in many articles in newspapers or fictions.
    I am much obliged to you for your guidance.

    Thanks.
    A phase beginning with a preposition is prepositional phrase which acts as a modifier. So if you drop the preposition, whether at the beginning or in the middle, it ceases to function as a modifier(adding information). Please note that a prepositional phrase is very seldom a working part of a sentence. In other words, a prepositional phrase can be eliminated from the sentence, and the basic structure of the sentence is not changed, but they are in fact, needed for a sentence to make sense.

    In a fit of rage he broke the window with a brick.
    Even if you take out the prep phrase, the rest the sentence works.

    See another example:
    From many sources, the members at the Community Food Bank gather a rich variety of surplus and unassailable food and distribute it to day-care centers for the elderly.

    If you remove the prep phrases (highlighted) the remaining still works:
    The members gather a rich variety of surplus and unassailable food and distribute it

  2. Junior Member
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    #4

    Smile Re: omission of starting prepositions

    1. After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher because of a head injury.

    the above sentence is of "cause and effect", I wonder if I can change the dependent clause to non-finite clause(past participle phrase), just like the sentence below.

    After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher, injured on his head.

    Here is another example I copied from my dictionary.

    The boy strutted along trying to catch the attention of a group of grils.

    the underlined above is non-finite clause stating the reason.


    2. (With) Sword in hand, he lunged at his adversary.

    Could you advise me under what circumstances I may omit the starting preposition ? just like the second sentence.

    I am much obliged to you for your guidance.

    Thanks
    Last edited by kl004535; 13-Mar-2010 at 04:03.

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    #5

    Re: omission of starting prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    1. After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher because of a head injury.


    After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher, injured on his head.
    "injured on his head" is an awkward phrase that I don't hear or say.

    The boy strutted along trying to catch the attention of a group of grils.
    This sentence above is active voice. Our original sentence is passive voice.

    2. (With) Sword in hand, he lunged at his adversary.

    Could you advise me under what circumstances I may omit the starting preposition ? just like the second sentence.
    You can omit the starting preposition when it is not needed. "With" adds nothing to the sentence. With or without "With", we know he has a sword in his hand.



    Thanks
    2006

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    #6

    Smile Re: omission of starting prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    After three minutes in the pitch, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher, injured on his head.
    "injured on his head" is an awkward phrase that I don't hear or say.

    What about amending the sentence a little bit without changing its original meaning?

    Injured on his head, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher after 3 minutes in the pitch.

    Does it make any improvement ?

    I am much obliged to you for your guidance.

    Thanks

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    #7

    Re: omission of starting prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    What about amending the sentence a little bit without changing its original meaning?

    Injured on his head, he was carried out of the pitch on a stretcher after 3 minutes in the pitch.

    Does it make any improvement ? sorry, no

    I am much obliged to you for your guidance.

    Thanks
    2006

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