Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. Banned
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 162
    #1

    Exclamation Go+gerund

    Dear teachers,

    We say "go shopping", "go fishing", but
    why it is not "go taking a bath"?
    Instead I often saw people not using gerund after "Go", for example:

    Group A:
    1. Go take some good food
    2. Go buy yourself new toys
    But not
    Group B:
    1. Go taking some good food
    2. Go buying yourself new toys

    The sentences in Group A are confusing.
    Could you help clarify please, teachers.

    Thank you

    Kitty

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1,704
    #2

    Re: Go+gerund

    In some sentences, you'll see also a 'to' infinitive after go as in:
    I'll go to sleep.
    I don't think there is a simple rule that would explain all these differences. You should learn these phrases separately. But I'm not a teacher and maybe I'm wrong.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovenian
      • Home Country:
      • Slovenia
      • Current Location:
      • Slovenia

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 78
    #3

    Re: Go+gerund

    I'm not quite sure, but I think that 'go take a bath' is not a grammatical sentence and is used in colloquial, spoken language.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1,704
    #4

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu39 View Post
    I'm not quite sure, but I think that 'go take a bath' is not a grammatical sentence and is used in colloquial, spoken language.
    In my opinion there is nothing wrong grammatically about this sentence, at least if you put a comma after 'go'. But in speech, there is often no pause there.

  2. IHIVG's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 354
    #5

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu39 View Post
    I'm not quite sure, but I think that 'go take a bath' is not a grammatical sentence and is used in colloquial, spoken language.
    It's two completely different matters - bad grammar and colloquialism, which do not have to go hand in hand. Can you think of a sentence in which speaking of, or even, telling someone to take a bath would be considered a 'formal language'?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovenian
      • Home Country:
      • Slovenia
      • Current Location:
      • Slovenia

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 78
    #6

    Re: Go+gerund

    I agree. If you put a comma there, then it's ok. Otherwise, I still think you shouldn't use it in written language.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #7

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by kwfine View Post
    Dear teachers,

    We say "go shopping", "go fishing", but
    why it is not "go taking a bath"?
    Instead I often saw people not using gerund after "Go", for example:

    Group A:
    1. Go take some good food
    2. Go buy yourself new toys
    But not
    Group B:
    1. Go taking some good food
    2. Go buying yourself new toys

    The sentences in Group A are confusing.
    Could you help clarify please, teachers.

    Thank you

    Kitty

    ***NOT A TEACHER***

    kwfine, good morning.

    (1) I have checked by books. May I share what I learned?

    (2) We may use go + -ing for sporting & leisure (free time) activities: I want to go shopping./ He has gone shopping./ Let's go shopping.
    (a) To take a bath is not a sporting or leisure activity.
    (i) Therefore, if you said, "I want to go taking a bath," native speakers would not accept that as correct.

    (3) When we want to give an order, we can say:
    (a) Sit down!
    (b) Go sit down!


    (4) In those orders, you must use the simple infinitive (no "to").
    (a) The rules of English do not permit -ing.
    (i)Therefore, you CANNOT say: *Sitting down! *Go sitting down!

    Thanks for your question. It really made me think. Have a nice day.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #8

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by kwfine View Post
    Dear teachers,

    We say "go shopping", "go fishing", but
    why it is not "go taking a bath"?
    Wouldn't the obvious cognate be "Go bathing"?

    Instead I often saw people not using gerund after "Go", for example:

    Group A:
    1. Go take some good food
    2. Go buy yourself new toys
    This is American. Elsewhere you'd find "Go and buy yourself some new toys."

    But not
    Group B:
    1. Go taking some good food
    2. Go buying yourself new toys

    "Go and <verb> something" is a different construction from "Go <verbing>.
    Some verbs work with "Go <verbing>" and some don't.

    The sentences in Group A are confusing.
    Could you help clarify please, teachers.

    Thank you

    Kitty
    R.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovenian
      • Home Country:
      • Slovenia
      • Current Location:
      • Slovenia

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 78
    #9

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by IHIVG View Post
    It's two completely different matters - bad grammar and colloquialism, which do not have to go hand in hand. Can you think of a sentence in which speaking of, or even, telling someone to take a bath would be considered a 'formal language'?
    I'm afraid I cannot quite agree. Of course colloquialism and grammar errors are two different things, but in my opinion they often coincide.
    When we speak we tend to simplify language and we don't strictly follow grammar rules. This happens in all languages.
    Some examples in English:

    I'm not feeling fine. (feel is a state verb, so it shouldn't be used in progressive form.

    There's a lot of interesting books over there. (spoken language)

    Native speakers can probably add thousands of examples...

    The example we discussed above 'go take a bath' is in my opinion ungrammatical and yes, I agree, it would be used in spoken language only.

    One more thing: I think that Americans are more into simplifying the language than the British, for example. Do you agreee?
    This statement doesn't imply any nationalistic preferences, I just wanted to express my opinion about differences in using the language.

  4. IHIVG's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 354
    #10

    Re: Go+gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Mzungu39 View Post
    I'm afraid I cannot quite agree. Of course colloquialism and grammar errors are two different things, but in my opinion they often coincide.
    When we speak we tend to simplify language and we don't strictly follow grammar rules. This happens in all languages.
    Some examples in English:

    I'm not feeling fine. (feel is a state verb, so it shouldn't be used in progressive form.

    There's a lot of interesting books over there. (spoken language)

    Native speakers can probably add thousands of examples...

    The example we discussed above 'go take a bath' is in my opinion ungrammatical and yes, I agree, it would be used in spoken language only.

    One more thing: I think that Americans are more into simplifying the language than the British, for example. Do you agreee?
    This statement doesn't imply any nationalistic preferences, I just wanted to express my opinion about differences in using the language.
    I respectfully disagree. I still think that 'colloquial' has nothing to do with 'ungrammatical' at all. The phrases/words that are colloquial don't have to be grammatically incorrect and vice versa. (BTW, I'm not sure we should bring up the word 'coincidence' here- it's hard to speak of the matters and apply logic where coincidence is involved).

    Here's definitions of the words "informal' and 'nonstandard' according to Arnold Zwicky, Professor of linguistics at Stanford University:

    Informal: "Not formal or ceremonious; casual; more appropriate for use in the spoken language than in the written language".

    Nonstandard: "Associated with a language variety used by uneducated speakers or socially disfavored groups".

    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/002447.html

    The article also reflects on why "there's + plural noun phrase" should be characterized as merely informal rather than ungrammatical.

    I agree with you that AmE seems to be more simplistic in some aspects of the language (for instance, leaving out the letters like in the words "favor", "savor"). But those examples just explain the difference between BrE and AmE.

    PS: I can't believe that something is wrong with this sentence: 'I'm not feeling fine'.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Gerund after Gerund
    By kl004535 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Jan-2010, 05:33
  2. Headlines - Gerund
    By Nightmare85 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2010, 04:38
  3. Simple gerund and Perfect gerund
    By Volcano1985 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Nov-2009, 11:30
  4. Gerund or participle?
    By Humble in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 24-Mar-2007, 17:59
  5. Gerund Diagramming Help
    By Tyler07 in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2007, 22:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •