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    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #1

    help me

    the adverb "yet" have many means.
    1.at the present time; now: Don't go yet. Are they here yet?
    2. in the time still remaining; before all is done: There is yet time.
    3. though the case be such; nevertheless: strange and yet very true.
    I remark that each position of yet of each sentence is different. do they are the proper position to each mean ?
    please help me out

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: help me

    Quote Originally Posted by hitinvo View Post
    The adverb "yet" has many meanings.
    1. At the present time; now: Don't go yet. Are they here yet?
    2. In the time still remaining; before all is done: There is yet time.
    3. Though the case be such; nevertheless: strange and yet very true.
    I remark that each position of yet of each sentence is different. Do they have are the proper position to (for) each meaning?
    Please help me out!
    It is correct that yet has different meanings.
    Furthermore I do not really believe that it depends on the position.
    In my opinion it depends on the whole context.
    However, to be honest, I'm not sure and I'm interested too, if this is true.

    There is yet time. -> There is still time. (It's not too late.)
    There is time yet. -> There is time now. (Now is a good chance.)

    Don't worry, hitinvo, I'm asking the teachers and other members

    Cheers!

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: help me

    Teachers and members, your help is still wanted

    Cheers!

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    #4

    Re: help me

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    It is correct that yet has different meanings.
    Furthermore I do not really believe that it depends on the position.
    I agree.
    In my opinion it depends on the whole context. This is my opinion too.
    However, to be honest, I'm not sure and I'm interested too, if this is true.

    There is yet time. -> There is still time. (It's not too late.)
    There is time yet. -> There is time now. (Now is a good chance.)
    I believe that both these sentences mean exactly the same.

    Don't worry, hitinvo, I'm asking the teachers and other members

    Cheers!

    Some sentences:
    I haven't yet recieved the letter. (not popular)
    I haven't recieved the letter yet. (popular)

    And yet it moves!
    She's dumb; yet she attracts boys with her big breasts.

    I am not a teacher and too hope that someone wiser than me will answer this thread.

  3. kfredson's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: help me

    Quote Originally Posted by hitinvo View Post
    the adverb "yet" have many means.
    1.at the present time; now: Don't go yet. Are they here yet?
    2. in the time still remaining; before all is done: There is yet time.
    3. though the case be such; nevertheless: strange and yet very true.
    I remark that each position of yet of each sentence is different. do they are the proper position to each mean ?
    please help me out
    Yes, I agree with Mr. Nightmare. It depends on the context. And your examples above are correct. As for position, I'm not sure but it does seem to me that "yet" can move around slightly if it refers to time.
    "They are not yet here." "They are not yet here."

    When it has the meaning of "nevertheless" I believe it has to come at the beginning, as in your statement: "Strange and yet very true."
    Perhaps that distinguishes it from the temporal use, since if we say, "Yet they are not here" it is clear that we are using it in the sense of "nevertheless."

    Thanks for bringing it up. Perhaps others have additional ways of looking at it.


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    #6

    Re: help me

    So i have another condition using "yet"
    -1- i have much thing to study from you yet.
    -2- i have much thing yet to study from you.
    which one is the right sentence?
    please, help me!

  4. kfredson's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: help me

    Quote Originally Posted by hitinvo View Post
    So i have another condition using "yet"
    -1- i have much thing to study from you yet.
    -2- i have much thing yet to study from you.
    which one is the right sentence?
    please, help me!
    I would make two points here. In the first place, we would use either "much" or "many things" but not "much thing." In the second place, we would say "learn from," rather than "study from."

    Hence, I would rephrase the sentence as, "I have much to learn from you."

    As for "yet," it would normally go at the end. It might conceivably go after "have," but this would be unusual -- more common in an earlier time.

    Still more common would be the use of the word "still." Typically we would write, "I still have much to learn from you."

    I hope that is useful. Word order is quite challenging at first but with a little practice you will quickly catch on. Good luck!

  5. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: help me

    Don't you think "a lot" would be the correct version?
    I agree with you, but maybe this one is 100% correct :
    I still have a lot to learn from you.
    It's neither a negative sentence nor a question.
    As far as I know much can be used in positive and normal sentences, too, but only here:
    He drives much faster than I do.

    Or in our case:
    Do I still have much to learn from you?

    Cheers!

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: help me

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Don't you think "a lot" would be the correct version?
    I agree with you, but maybe this one is 100% correct :
    I still have a lot to learn from you.
    It's neither a negative sentence nor a question.
    As far as I know much can be used in positive and normal sentences, too, but only here:
    He drives much faster than I do.

    Or in our case:
    Do I still have much to learn from you?

    Cheers!
    "I still have much to learn (from you)" is correct, it may be less common than "a lot" these days but it's still in use.

  7. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: help me

    Is it because of the still?

    Would it mean: "I have much to learn." is not correct?

    Cheers!

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