Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 17
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    "Please sit down"

    Hi all,
    "Please, sit down".
    Here, "sit down" is a phrasal verb.
    Under which part of speech do we consider "down" in this sentence?

    Thanks.

  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: "Please sit down"

    Quote Originally Posted by indian123 View Post
    Hi all,
    "Please, sit down".
    Here, "sit down" is a phrasal verb.
    Under which part of speech do we consider "down" in this sentence?

    Thanks.
    adverb

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 17
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: "Please sit down"

    Hi Corum,
    Thanks a lot.
    Could you please explain, how it becomes an adverb?
    Last edited by indian123; 18-Mar-2010 at 09:27.

  2. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: "Please sit down"

    Quote Originally Posted by indian123 View Post
    Hi Corum,
    Thanks a lot.
    Could you please explain, how it becomes an adverb?
    The meaning of 'down' in 'sit down' is something along the lines of 'to a lower position'. Constituents that convey such meaning are called adverbials. What grammatical units can realize an adverbial?

    1. nouns (adverbial objective)
    2. prepositional phrases
    3. adverbs

    By process of elimination, you will probably arrive at adverbs. Why can we rule out 'down' being a PP? Because there is either no prep or there is no complement. How about the noun interpretation?

    i. I am going home.
    ii. I am sitting down.

    As you can see, your question is not as simple as it may seem at face value.
    In i, the way I see the sentence, there is an omitted preposition:

    I am going (to) home.

    In ii, however, I can't imagine a preposition inserted like this:

    I am siting (to) down.

    Adverb is my answer to 'down' regarding its form. It is important to bear in mind that adverb is a notion related to form. Adverbial is the name for the functional counterpart.
    Last edited by corum; 18-Mar-2010 at 10:12.

  3. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 1,121
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: "Please sit down"

    I am going slowly home.
    I am going my home.

    slowly seems to work but 'my' does not. Kewl! (I was just pursuing my thread of thought further)

Similar Threads

  1. [General] connocations of "knock down"
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2009, 23:11
  2. phrasal verbs "break down"
    By ivygreen in forum English Phrasal Verbs
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-May-2008, 14:10
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Feb-2008, 05:03
  4. the phrase, "please advice."
    By rodec in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2005, 16:12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •