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    • Join Date: Mar 2010
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    #1

    Question Is it possible to use "make someone doing ~" ?

    Hello, Teachers?

    I have a lot of visitors coming to see me at home.

    I make a lot of visitors coming to see me at home.

    I keep a lot of visitors coming to see me at home.


    Which one of the aboves is correct or incorrect grammatically ?

    In my view, All seems to be correct and possible.

    If not, explain to me why, please !

    Thank you for your kindness !

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: Is it possible to use "make someone doing ~" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by whitehawke View Post
    Hello, Teachers?

    I have a lot of visitors coming (come)to see me at home.

    I make a lot of visitors coming(come) to see me at home.

    I keep a lot of visitors coming to see me at home.


    Which one of the aboves is correct or incorrect grammatically ?

    In my view, All seems to be correct and possible.

    If not, explain to me why, please !

    Thank you for your kindness !
    Welcome to the forum. In the first two sentences ‘have’ and ‘make’ act as causative verbs, so the action verb ‘come’ should be an infinitive or a bare infinitive.

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    #3

    Re: Is it possible to use "make someone doing ~" ?

    I have a lot of visitors coming to see me a home. "have" is not necessarily causative.

    I have a lot of visitors come to see me at home. "have" is causative.

    I keep a lot of visitors coming to see me at home. "keep" is causative but we still use "coming".


    • Join Date: Mar 2010
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    #4

    Re: Is it possible to use "make someone doing ~" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Welcome to the forum. In the first two sentences ‘have’ and ‘make’ act as causative verbs, so the action verb ‘come’ should be an infinitive or a bare infinitive.
    Thank you for replying ! but,

    As it is generally used " I saw him crossing the bridge", if to express the meaning of progressive, it is likey to use "have O ~ing" or "make O ~ing" like the followings ???


    I have a lot of visitors (be) coming to see me at home.
    => I order a lot of visitors to be coming to see me at home.

    I make a lot of visitors (be) coming to see me at home.
    => I force a lot of visitors to be coming to see me at home.

    Referring to Online Longman Dictionary, I found the following meanings and examples.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    27
    make somebody do something

    [not in progressive]
    a) to affect someone in a way that makes them start doing something have somebody laughing/crying etc
    Within minutes he had the whole audience laughing and clapping.



    b) to persuade or order someone to do something
    have somebody doing something
    She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.


    have somebody do something especially American English
    I'll have Hudson show you to your room.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    But, relating to the use of "make", I can find only the next.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    5 force

    [transitive] to force someone to do something make somebody do something
    My parents always make me do my homework before I go out.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Finally, according to Longman Dictionary, I quess, it is sometimes possible to use the form of "have O ~ing".

    and I found the form of "make O ~ing" anavailable. I don't know why yet. only because people don't use lile that in custom and practice ?

    In not the view of grammar, but the view of literature, to express "to force someone to be doing", I must not use like that ???

    waiting for your help ! thank you...

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    #5

    Exclamation Re: Is it possible to use "make someone doing ~" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by whitehawke View Post
    Thank you for replying ! but,

    In not the view of grammar, but the view of literature, to express "to force someone to be doing", I must not use like that ???

    waiting for your help ! thank you...
    Yes, it is always advisable. You can not force someone to be doing. We use the causative when we do not carry out an action ourselves, but are responsible for the action being performed. The common causative verbs, are:: let, help, allow, have, require, allow, motivate, get, make, convince, hire, assist, encourage, permit, employ, force. Most of these verbs are followed by an object (noun or pronoun) followed by an infinitive:. As:
    She hired a carpenter to build a new birdcage.
    The teacher allows his students to leave the class early.

    Three causative verbs are exceptions to the pattern described above. Instead of being followed by a noun/pronoun and an infinitive, the causative verbs have, make and let are followed by a noun/pronoun (called the agent) and the base form of the verb (which is actually an infinitive with the "to" left off).As:
    The teacher had her students read four short novels in one week.
    She also made them read five plays in one week.
    However, she let them skip the terminal exam.

    Of course ‘have’ being an auxiliary verb, some people use ‘ing’ form after the agent, but I would prefer not to do so. There are two forms of the causative verb 'have'.
    Use !: Subject + Have + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    They had John arrive early.
    She had her children cook dinner for her.

    Use 2 Subject + Have + Object + Past Participle
    Examples:
    I had my hair cut last Saturday.
    She had the car washed at the weekend.

    Note: This form is similar in meaning to the passive.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 20-Mar-2010 at 06:26.

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