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    #1

    There are the morning papers ...

    Hello!

    Below is an excerpt from a textbook.

    Section 1
    Above omitted
    The British people are, therefore, great readers of news papers. There are few homes to which one newspaper is not delivered every morning. Many households have two, or even three, newspapers every morning. One newspaper may be delivered at the house, a member of the family may buy one at the station bookstall to read in the train as he goes to town, and someone else in the family may buy an evening newspaper later in the day.

    Section 2
    Daily papers are those that are published daily from Monday to Saturday. There are the morning papers and the evening papers.
    The morning papers are on sale early in the morning.
    Below omitted
    ( from Newspapers in Great Britain, Hornby, OUP)

    In the Section 2 “There are the morning papers and the evening papers.”, why are the expressions “morning papers” and “evening papers” introduced with the definite article on each of them?
    Does the sentence “There are morning papers and evening papers.” have a different meaning and is it inadequate in this context?
    I suppose the original sentence conveys the ideas of “our, nearness, etc” through the use of the article and the sentence without the article does not necessarily refer to the papers in Great Britain.
    Please explain on the matter.

    Sincerely

    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #2

    Re: There are the morning papers ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kazuo View Post
    Hello!

    Below is an excerpt from a textbook.

    Section 1
    Above omitted
    The British people are, therefore, great readers of news papers. There are few homes to which one newspaper is not delivered every morning. Many households have two, or even three, newspapers every morning. One newspaper may be delivered at the house, a member of the family may buy one at the station bookstall to read in the train as he goes to town, and someone else in the family may buy an evening newspaper later in the day.

    Section 2
    Daily papers are those that are published daily from Monday to Saturday. There are the morning papers and the evening papers( of those daily papers which are published daily from Monday to Saturday - anaphoric reference).
    The morning papers are on sale early in the morning.
    Below omitted
    ( from Newspapers in Great Britain, Hornby, OUP)

    In the Section 2 “There are the morning papers and the evening papers.”, why are the expressions “morning papers” and “evening papers” introduced with the definite article on each of them?
    Does the sentence “There are morning papers and evening papers.” have a different meaning and is it inadequate in this context?
    I suppose the original sentence conveys the ideas of “our, nearness, etc” through the use of the article and the sentence without the article does not necessarily refer to the papers in Great Britain.
    Please explain on the matter.

    Sincerely
    (Not a teacher)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 144
    #3

    Re: There are the morning papers ...

    Hello!

    Thank you very much for your letter and for your detailed explanations.

    I’m sorry but there are things I can’t understand. Could you answer to my questions below?

    <they are specific newspapers - morning and evening.>
    In what way have morning papers and evening papers become specific and qualified to take the definite article?
    Do you mean those morning and evening newspapers that the writer reads? I thought so in connection with the last part of your explanation, i.e. "There are morning papers in Japan. The morning paper I read is XXX."

    <morning and evening>
    It’s not clear whether this expression is used to mean a type of newspaper which is published by one company in the form of morning and evening editions under the same name (or title, e.g. ABC Times) of the paper, which is common in Japan. And that you didn’t say <morning or evening> is the key to understanding? (which is related to your sentence below.)

    <The writer chose to select only a couple of papers - morning and evening - from all possible papers.>
    One cannot choose to select from a set of things without some standards or criteria, that is, how to choose to select.
    Please let me know what they are.

    Thanks in advance

    Sincerely

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