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    #1

    "insist" '"persist" "persevere"

    "insist" '"persist" "persevere"
    what is the difference of those words?
    thanks

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    #2

    Re: "insist" '"persist" "persevere"

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    "insist" '"persist" "persevere"
    what is the difference of those words?
    thanks
    Hello Kelvin,

    I am not a teacher, but I reckon it is better if you write sentences. I say you that because the border line or the edge between these three words are not big and in some case have similar meaning. Whatever write us entirely your quote and I'm sure teachers can help to find what you are looking for.

    See later on the forum.

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    #3

    Re: "insist" '"persist" "persevere"

    I am looking forward to other opinion.

  1. IHIVG's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "insist" '"persist" "persevere"

    I think 'persist' and 'persevere' can be used as absolute synonyms, that is to doggedly continue to do something:
    If you persevere with your search for a job, you are sure to find it soon.
    Even though everybody told him he was wrong, he persisted in his opinion.
    Chances are slim for her to win this title, yet she still persists in trying.

    'Insist' can have a similar meaning. For example, when someone stubbornly makes an allegation:
    The prisoner insisted on his innocence.

    However, I think more often 'insist' implies demand or even order. You're demanding something from someone when you insist on it:
    I insist on the return of my money at once!

    Anyway, all three words are pretty close in meanings, although there are nuances when each of them can have a slightly different undertone.

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