Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 843
    #1

    going to x gonna

    She´s not going to work today
    She isn´t going to work today
    She´s not gonna work today
    She isn´t gonna work today
    Which one of these sentences is more common in conversations? What does it depend on? Age? Where one is from? Does the same go for sentences in the affirmative and interrogative?

  2. kfredson's Avatar

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 700
    #2

    Re: going to x gonna

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    She´s not going to work today
    She isn´t going to work today
    She´s not gonna work today
    She isn´t gonna work today
    Which one of these sentences is more common in conversations? What does it depend on? Age? Where one is from? Does the same go for sentences in the affirmative and interrogative?
    The first two are common and mean the same thing.
    The last two are not so much different phrases as they are a simple slurring of the sounds.

    However, the first two are in fact more ambiguous. They could mean that she is not going to place of work (e.g., and office) or they could mean that she is not going to work, whether she goes to a work place or not.

    If you slur it into "gonna" you are clearly saying she's not going to do any work. If your meaning is that she's not going to her place of work you would pronounce "going" clearly.

    Of course, if that is your meaning it's better to avoid the confusion altogether:
    She is not going to go to work today. (Or, if you like to slur your words, "She's not gonna go to work today.")

    I hope I haven't overly complicated a simple issue!

    And yes, this should apply to the affirmative as well as the negative. As for the age issue, I don't know. It may have more to do with level of education. It may have to do with the situation -- or the person with whom you're speaking.

    But I'm not gonna go there!*

    * An increasingly common expression in the U.S. which means "That's too hot of an issue for me to touch" or "I'll just leave that topic alone."

  3. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 843
    #3

    Re: going to x gonna

    I´ve chosen the wrong verb, because of this ambiguity. I should´ve chosen any other. I was just wondering which was the most common way to say it in English:
    she isn´t gonna/going to do it, or she´s not gonna/going to do it.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,593
    #4

    Re: going to x gonna

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    I´ve chosen the wrong verb, because of this ambiguity. I should´ve chosen any other. I was just wondering which was the most common way to say it in English:
    she isn´t gonna/going to do it, or she´s not gonna/going to do it.
    "She's not..."

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #5

    Re: going to x gonna

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    I´ve chosen the wrong verb, because of this ambiguity. I should´ve chosen any other. I was just wondering which was the most common way to say it in English:
    she isn´t gonna/going to do it, or she´s not gonna/going to do it.
    I'd say 'isn't' is, at least where I come from. But both are equally correct.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #6

    Re: going to x gonna

    In my opinion "She's not going to..." is better, because the not belongs more to the going to, or better said: It highlights the going to well.
    She's not going to work today.

    I would rather use isn't in such a sentence:
    She isn't nice.
    She isn't here.

    However, I guess it's everyone's own opinion.
    (Both should be equally correct as already said.)

    P.S: I would not use gonna for written English.

    Cheers!

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Gonna
    By The French in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 25-Nov-2009, 19:07
  2. when we gonna ho ho ho !
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2008, 20:49
  3. We gonna take the ball game _______ real soon
    By XINLAI-UE in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2008, 14:54
  4. The voice of gonna?
    By sky753 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-May-2007, 17:12
  5. 'gonna' etc.
    By toddler in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2005, 21:04

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •