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    #1

    celibate

    Hello, teachers:
    If men or woman has no intention of getting marriage, may I say he/she is a celibate?
    Also, I am wondering if the term has a negative connotation.
    May I have your clarificaition?
    Thanks a lot!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: celibate

    In the US, the term is usually used to mean the person doesn't have sex.

    Many people with no intention to marry will still have plenty of sex.

    You can say the person is a confirmed bachelor. (If male.)
    You can say the person is committed to remaining single.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: celibate

    Thanks a lot!
    You can say the person is a confirmed bachelor. (If male.)
    You can say the person is committed to remaining single.
    So I am wondering if there is any netural term to call woman who is committed to remaining single?
    I have a vague memory that the term "spinster" has a negative connotation.
    Also, may I have your confirmation?
    Thanks a lot!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: celibate

    Yes, it's definitely negative - it has the idea that no one wanted her.

    And "a confirmed bachelorette" sounds silly.


    I guess English doesn't have a phrase for this because we still reflect the idea that a woman's highest aspiration is to get married and the language hasn't caught up yet.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: celibate

    Thanks a lot!
    It's helpful!

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