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  1. terrenziqq's Avatar
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    #1

    All, Both, Every with not in sentences.

    "Not all that glitters is gold."
    I think this sentence shows a partially negative tone.
    But what if the "not" is placed before "gold"?- "All that glitters is not gold."
    I by instinct would consider it completely negative .
    How about "every" and "both"?
    Ex: Not every student likes Lisa.
    To me, it surely means part of the students don't like Lisa.
    But how about " Every student doesn't like Lisa."?
    Does it mean the same thing?
    Some say "all", "both" ,"every" with not in sentences all express a partially negative tone in spite of the fact that where not is while others say only the sentences with not in the beginning show a partially negative tone.
    So, which is right?

  2. IHIVG's Avatar
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      • Russian
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    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 354
    #2

    Re: All, Both, Every with not in sentences.

    Quote Originally Posted by terrenziqq View Post
    "Not all that glitters is gold."
    I think this sentence shows a partially negative tone.
    But what if the "not" is placed before "gold"?- "All that glitters is not gold."
    I by instinct would consider it completely negative .
    How about "every" and "both"?
    Ex: Not every student likes Lisa.
    To me, it surely means part of the students don't like Lisa.
    But how about " Every student doesn't like Lisa."?
    Does it mean the same thing?
    Some say "all", "both" ,"every" with not in sentences all express a partially negative tone in spite of the fact that where not is while others say only the sentences with not in the beginning show a partially negative tone.
    So, which is right?
    Not every student likes Lisa. Yes, it implies that some students do not like the girl and some probably do.

    Every student doesn't like Lisa. No one (of the students) likes her.

    However, I think it's a different story with this particular proverb you mentioned.
    The original saying is, 'All that glitters is not gold'. The meaning is that appearances can be deceptive and some things that look good might turn out to be a disappointment. I don't think it means that ALL glittering things are necessarily bad -(but I suspect that is what one might be tempted to think if one is unfamiliar with the proverb) - but rather that just because things are precious on the outside doesn't mean they are valuable (they may or may not be so).
    In other words, ironically, 'Not all that glitters is gold' is exactly what this proverb is trying to say.

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