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    #1

    time

    I wonder if there is a subtle difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. It's time for you to go home.
    2. It's time you went home.


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    #2

    Re: time

    Hi womennglish,
    The first sentence make more sense than the second one because you are saying to another person is his or her time to go =)

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    #3

    Re: time

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. It's time for you to go home.
    2. It's time you went home.
    Hi I am not a teacher,

    but in my mind in your second sentences you have used the simple past tense of the verb go to speak about the present time. I am a bit perplexed of this construction and maybe if you used a modal verbs it is better.

    Cordially,

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: time

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. It's time for you to go home.
    2. It's time you went home.
    They are both correct and there is no real difference in meaning.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: time

    There are a few threads on the "It's time..." construction.

    When we say "It's time [past]" it means "The situation makes it advisable."

    When we say "It is time for [infinitive]" it's more neutral and simply says that the appointed hour has arrived.

    For example, "It's time you went on some medication" is said (probably jokingly) to someone who have given you a crazy idea.

    "It's time for you to take your medication" means that you were supposed to take your pill at (for example) 2 p.m. and it's now 2 p.m.

    It's time you went to bed! -- Said to a child who is, perhaps, behaving a bit rambunctiously.

    It's time for you to got to bed. -- Said to a child to let him know that it's simply bed time.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: time

    To add to this specific example:

    Let's say you're a mom and your son has a friend over.

    Let's say he's behaving badly and you don't want him in your house any longer.
    "John, it's time you went home." (Get out before I really lose my temper.)

    Now instead, let's say his mother had told you she needed him back home by 5:30 p.m. At 5:25, you say "John, it's time for you to go home." (You should leave now to be home on time.)

    In other situations, they may be exactly the same.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: time

    [QUOTE=Barb_D;585206]

    Hello teacher,

    If I understand well the difference between your two end-sentences one of them is more like an order. There is just a little border line in the meaning, one is a kind remark while the other is perhaps more direct.

    But I believe it is clear for me now.

    Thanks to have a patience to read me and to correct me (For me defense I can just tell you it's not always easy to perceive all the subtlety of English language).

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: time

    Don't think of it ONLY as an order -- it's also used for advice or what you think is a good idea.

    Don't you think it's time you got a new car? (It seems a new car would be a good idea.)
    It's time we called this done. (Let's say we're finished.)
    It's time our team got together in person instead of via conference call, don't you think? (It would be beneficial to meet face-to-face.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: time

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Don't think of it ONLY as an order -- it's also used for advice or what you think is a good idea.

    Don't you think it's time you got a new car? (It seems a new car would be a good idea.)
    It's time we called this done. (Let's say we're finished.)
    It's time our team got together in person instead of via conference call, don't you think? (It would be beneficial to meet face-to-face.)
    Hi again Barbara,

    Now all it's clear in my mind. It is like agree, maybe the habit can help me.

    See you later.

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    #10

    Re: time

    [QUOTE=The French;585219]
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post

    Hello teacher,

    If I understand well the difference between your two end-sentences one of them is more like an order. There is just a little border line in the meaning, one is a kind remark while the other is perhaps more direct.

    But I believe it is clear for me now.

    Thanks to have a patience to read me and to correct me (For me defense I can just tell you it's not always easy to perceive all the subtlety of English language).
    I do believe that French has just has many subtleties! In any case, thank you for bringing up these two sentences and my thanks go to Barb D. for pointing out the subtle difference. In practice, of course, it is more important just what tone you take with your voice and your facial expression. Depending on how you say it, either sentence could get across your meaning -- whether to order, to remind, or just to nudge someone a little.

    In other words, the subtlety may will be more in the style of delivery than in the words. Again, I imagine that is true in French, as well, no?

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