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  1. jayne
    Guest
    #1

    Red face it and there

    Please can someone tell me as simply as possible why the English say......it was a nice day yesterday and not there was a nice day yesterday.Yet English say there was snow yesterday.Jayne

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: it and there

    Quote Originally Posted by jayne
    Please can someone tell me as simply as possible why the English say......it was a nice day yesterday and not there was a nice day yesterday.Yet English say there was snow yesterday.Jayne
    Welcome, Jayne.

    Speakers use "There" when a location is part of the meaning of the sentence. For example,

    There was snow (on the ground) yesterday.
    TEST: Where was the snow? On the ground.

    There is a pen there.
    TEST: Where is the pen? There.

    Note, There/there functions as an adverb of place, just like "on the snow". The other one, There, functions as an empty subject. It's different. It has no real meaning, except it tells us that an adverb of place is coming up ahead in the sentence. Here's another example,

    There are three people in my family.
    TEST: Where are the three people? In my family.

    Notice that "people", "snow", and "pen" are things.

    Speakers use "It" elsewhere. For example,

    It is nice to see you.
    It is raining today.

    "nice to see you" and "raining today" are not things.

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