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    #1

    impact in and on

    Dear teachers,

    I think "to have impact on" collocates.But I read a sentence in which there is "impact in". Could you please if there is any difference between the two?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: impact in and on

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I think "to have impact on" collocates.But I read a sentence in which there is "impact in". Could you please if there is any difference between the two?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    The word ‘Impact’ can be used as a noun as well as verb. As verb it is sometimes followed by ‘on’ but not by ‘in’, as:
    Falling export rates have impacted (on) the country's economy quite considerably.
    As noun it means;a powerful effect that something, has on a situation or person.
    That effect you can either feel or see. When you only feel, use ‘on’ as a prepostion, as:
    The anti-smoking campaign had made quite an impact on young people.
    When you want see the impact within something, use ‘in’, as:
    A documentary film has been made on the effects of antismoking campaign on the youth. So we will be able to view its impact in the auditorium..

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    #3

    Re: impact in and on

    Hi sarat,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    May I say in most cases it should be "to impact on" and "have an impact on/in"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    The word ‘Impact’ can be used as a noun as well as verb. As verb it is sometimes followed by ‘on’ but not by ‘in’, as:
    Falling export rates have impacted (on) the country's economy quite considerably.
    As noun it means;a powerful effect that something, has on a situation or person.
    That effect you can either feel or see. When you only feel, use ‘on’ as a prepostion, as:
    The anti-smoking campaign had made quite an impact on young people.
    When you want see the impact within something, use ‘in’, as:
    A documentary film has been made on the effects of antismoking campaign on the youth. So we will be able to view its impact in the auditorium..

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: impact in and on

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi sarat,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    May I say in most cases it should be "to impact on" and "have an impact on/in"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Yes, when used as a noun it is followed by preposition on/in, but not as verb.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: impact in and on

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Yes, when used as a noun it is followed by preposition on/in, but not as verb.
    I think the safest rule is not to use 'impact' as a verb unless you're a dentist; but I'm an old fuddy-duddy. (Tooth impaction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )

    b

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    #6

    Re: impact in and on

    Hi, BobK,
    Thank you very much for your explanation.

    What does this mean: "unless you're a dentist"?
    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think the safest rule is not to use 'impact' as a verb unless you're a dentist; but I'm an old fuddy-duddy. (Tooth impaction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: impact in and on

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi, BobK,
    Thank you very much for your explanation.

    What does this mean: "unless you're a dentist"?
    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    It was a joke. If you (can?) read that Wikipedia article, you'll see why a dentist might want to use the verb 'impact'.

    b

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