Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovak
      • Home Country:
      • Slovak Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Slovak Republic

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 59
    #1

    Smoother vehicle

    Hello teachers,

    I would love to ask for your help regarding engineering terminology. I have come across the following expression (in a workshop manual. It is about an engine of a bus. This specific part deals with the timing gear train):

    In the case of smoother vehicle, after loosening the bolts to fasten the flexible plate, remove the washer, the flexible plate, the spacer according to this order.


    I could not find in any dictionary, what a SMOOTHER vehicle could stand for. Also, it does not sound logical to me, that by loosening the bolts one could fasten something?!


    Thanks a lot for your openion on this.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 86
    #2

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hello Marvan,
    'in case of a smoother vehicle' might mean in order to have a smooth(er) riding vehicle.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovak
      • Home Country:
      • Slovak Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Slovak Republic

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 59
    #3

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hello,

    thank you for your reply. That is what I thought. But in the context it does not make sense to me. This part is talking about removal of different parts of a gear train. Do you think that one could make a bus go smoother by removing some parts of a gear train in a specific order?

    Thus I guess it might refer to a special kind of vehicle which has got the parts mentioned in my previous post. Other types do not have them.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,842
    #4

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    It does suggest a category of vehicle, which means it should have been defined somewhere. It could be a mistake or a direct translation- it should either be 'a smoother vehicle' or 'smoother vehicles', and 'according to this order', which again is not natural English. Where does the bus come from?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovak
      • Home Country:
      • Slovak Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Slovak Republic

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 59
    #5

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hi Tdol,
    I have found several kind of mistakes there. I guess it was created by the Japanese, since the mark of the bus is ISUZU.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #6

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Quote Originally Posted by marvan View Post
    Hi Tdol,
    I have found several kind of mistakes there. I guess it was created by the Japanese, since the mark of the bus is ISUZU.
    Isuzu boss: Anyone here can speak English to write manual of bus?
    Worker: I have stab at it!

    A major Japanese company should be able to do better than this in the 21st century. I hope they put more care into building the bus.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 86
    #7

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hello Marvan,
    It is possible to have a smoother running vehicle by loosening certain bolts if they are too tight but it depends which ones. If this sentence is not all by itself, what are the two sentences that come before it and the two that follow it?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Slovak
      • Home Country:
      • Slovak Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Slovak Republic

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 59
    #8

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hello everybody,
    Quite a discussion here :)

    Well, the sentence I mentioned in my original post is the beginning of a new paragraph. So there is nothing before it. It is followed by a picture.
    However, the term "smoother" is mentioned in the manual several times. E.g.:

    1. In a chart called "Main data and specification of a motor". Here, there are several specifications listed, among them e.g. idling speed. It is expressed in "rpm" (rotation per minute?) Then it is followed by 650 (smoother) and 575 (M/T).

    This makes me also believe these are two different types of a motor / bus?

    2. In a chapter named "Timing gear train". There is a picture of its components, which are all listed and explained below it. Some of them has got "smoother" in a bracket, some have "M/T". Others do not have this further specification. E.g.
    • Flexible plate (smoother)
    • Crankshaft end spacer (smoother)
    • Flywheel (M/T)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 86
    #9

    Re: Smoother vehicle

    Hello Marvan,
    What's the normal idling speed (revolutions per minute) of a bus or a car? If it's around 900 rpm, then we don't want 'smoother' we want 'quieter'. I don't know what M/T means.

Similar Threads

  1. is or has?
    By Nightmare85 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-Apr-2010, 14:21
  2. [General] the man was pinned down in the vehicle
    By dilermando in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2008, 19:25
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Dec-2007, 03:03
  4. On-land vehicle
    By Piak in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2007, 14:07
  5. destination vehicle vs. target vehicle
    By Torsten in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Mar-2006, 16:23

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •