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  1. RoseSpring's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation Goosebumps?

    What does it mean to give someone a goosebump or butterflies

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Goosebumps?

    You get goosebumps in response to a strong emotion - often fear, but sometimes awe or something moving.

    You also get them when you are cold.

    Butterflies tend to mean you are nervous.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Goosebumps?

    Specifically 'goosebumps' refers to what your skin looks like when you are frightened or cold; it's sometimes called 'gooseflesh'. They are both based on the image of a plucked goose.

    I believe the term 'butterflies' is an abbreviation of the phrase 'butterflies in one's stomach' - a queasy feeling.

    b

  4. buggles's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Goosebumps?

    "Goose bumps" is more common in the US.

    In the UK we are more likely to say, "goose pimples".

    "I had butterflies in my stomach when I was waiting to see that horror film and as soon as it started I got goose pimples all over my arms!"

    buggles (not a teacher)

  5. RoseSpring's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Goosebumps?

    Thanks for help indeed.

    But what is the expression used when I want to show or express my excitement?

  6. buggles's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Goosebumps?

    Quote Originally Posted by tasneemspring View Post
    Thanks for help indeed.

    But what is the expression used when I want to show or express my excitement?

    If you don't mind being vulgar, you can say, "I was so excited, I nearly wet myself!" However, I wouldn't use this in polite company!

    A more polite one might be, "I was so excited, I couldn't sit still!"

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Goosebumps?

    Quote Originally Posted by tasneemspring View Post
    Thanks for help indeed.

    But what is the expression used when I want to show or express my excitement?
    As far as I'm concerned, you can also get goosebumps when you're excited. I remember going to a concert a few years ago and, just before it started, I was very excited and definitely had goosebumps as a result.

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