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  1. julianna's Avatar
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    #1

    I need some help with If...

    I mix between Conditional type two and type three, I don't get well ,when should we use type two, and when should we use type three..
    would you teachers like to help me please . I have a test tomorrow .
    thanks
    Last edited by julianna; 07-Apr-2010 at 18:46.

  2. MASM's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I need some help with If...

    Quote Originally Posted by julianna View Post
    I mix between Conditional type two and type three, I don't get well ,when should we use type two, and when should we use type three..
    would you teachers like to help me please . I have a test tomorrow .
    thanks
    1. First Conditional
    First conditional sentences express future results of probable or expected conditions. The first conditional is for future actions dependent on the result of another future action or event, where there is a reasonable possibility of the conditions for the action being satisfied.
    “If he gets here soon, I’ll speak to him about it” (The speaker believes that there is a reasonable or good chance of seeing him)
    “If it rains, the roads will be wet”
    Formation: If + present simple + will
    2. Second Conditional
    Second conditional sentences express future results for conditions that are considered unlikely to occur: If I won the lottery , I would buy a car. If he should say that to me, I would run away.
    1. For future actions dependent on the result of another future action or event, where there is only a small possibility of the conditions for the action being satisfied. “If I won the lottery, I would stop working”
    2. For imaginary present actions, where the conditions for the action are not satisfied. “If you phoned home more often, they wouldn’t worry about you” The conditions are not satisfied because the person does not phone home, so they do worry)
    In Standard English, the verb “to be” can take the “were” form for all persons in the If clause: If I were you…


    Basically, it's like that, you can have a look at this page too:

  3. julianna's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I need some help with If...

    and when should we use "If+past perfect =conditional perfect would +have p.p "?

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: I need some help with If...

    Quote Originally Posted by julianna View Post
    and when should we use "If+past perfect =conditional perfect would +have p.p "?
    We use Past Perfect Tense in the if ~clause to refer to the hypothetical past.

    If I had known this earlier, I would have told you.
    If you had come me yesterday, I would have been able to help you

    However, the clause introduced by ‘if’ may contain a past subjunctive verb (if I were going, and not past perfect or indicative). The past subjunctive is used to describe an occurrence that is presupposed to be contrary to fact, as: if I were ten years younger, then the main verb of such a sentence must contain the modal verb would, as:

    If I were the President, I would have declared war against terrorism.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 08-Apr-2010 at 03:31.

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