Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    a few connotations of "get on"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    How is he getting on?

    How are you getting on with your work?

    get on = prosper or succeed

    Dad doesn't hear too well; he's getting on, you know.

    It is getting on forsupper-time.

    get on = get along = progress; advance, especially in years

    Get your coat on quickly, the taxi's waiting.

    get on = put on

    Don't be afraid of the horse, get on!

    The students get on the bus and sit back because they want to smoke.

    get on = go up

    How are you and your new neighbour getting on?

    We get on well with all of our neighbors except one.

    Does she get on well with your aunt?

    get on = be or continue to be on harmonious terms

    Get on withthe meeting.

    We've spent enough time talking about it; now let's get on with it.

    go on with = move ahead, pursue one's work

    It's getting on for noon, so we'd better eat lunch.

    get on for = advance toward an age, amount, time, and so on

    Get on, we shall miss the train at this rate.

    Get on with it, we've a train to catch!

    get on = hurry up; come on

    A clever lobbyist knows how to get on the good side of both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

    get on the good side = to gain the favor of someone; flatter or please another

    John's noisy eating habits get on your nerves.

    Children get on their parents' nerves by asking so many questions.

    get on one’s nerves = to make you nervous

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #2

    Exclamation Re: a few connotations of "get on"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    How is he getting on?

    How are you getting on with your work?

    get on = prosper or succeed.

    Dad doesn't hear too well; he's getting on, you know.

    It is getting on for supper-time.

    get on = get along = progress; advance, especially in years

    Get your coat on quickly, the taxi's waiting.

    get on = put on

    Don't be afraid of the horse, get on!

    The students get on the bus and sit back because they want to smoke.

    get on = go up

    How are you and your new neighbour getting on?

    We get on well with all of our neighbors except one.

    Does she get on well with your aunt?

    get on = be or continue to be on harmonious terms, agree

    Get on with the meeting.

    We've spent enough time talking about it; now let's get on with it.

    go on with = move ahead, pursue one's work

    It's getting on for noon, so we'd better eat lunch.

    get on for = advance toward an age, amount, time, and so on

    Get on, we shall miss the train at this rate.

    Get on with it, we've a train to catch!

    get on = hurry up; come on

    A clever lobbyist knows how to get on the good side of both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

    get on the good side = to gain the favor of someone; flatter or please another

    John's noisy eating habits get on your nerves.

    Children get on their parents' nerves by asking so many questions.

    get on one’s nerves = to make you nervous=Irritate
    It used to get on my nerves, when I see him moving with his girl friend.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    All look fine but I have a point. The expression get on with it is an idiom= Move ahead, pursue one's work.
    Possibly it may not be proper to in a sense to hurry up something.
    We've spent enough time talking about various aspects of the job ; now let's get on with it.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] a few connotations of "get round"
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Feb-2010, 19:24
  2. [General] a few connotations of "get up"
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Feb-2010, 21:36
  3. [General] a few connotations of "pass on"
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2009, 22:51
  4. [General] a few connotations of "go on"
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Dec-2009, 12:41
  5. "get the jump on" and "get a jump on"
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Aug-2009, 19:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •