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    #1

    start

    Dear teachers,

    Has David started ________?
    No. He is waiting for Amy outside.

    The key is either "out" or "along". But I can't find the latter and the former means "to begin your life, or the part of your life when you work, in a particular way" and I guess if I put "out" it means "start a journey". But what about "along"? Could you please explain that?
    In another book it is "off", which can't be found in my dictionary. Could you please explain that to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: start

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Has David started ________?
    No. He is waiting for Amy outside.

    The key is either "out" or "along". But I can't find the latter and the former means "to begin your life, or the part of your life when you work, in a particular way" and I guess if I put "out" it means "start a journey". But what about "along"? Could you please explain that?
    In another book it is "off", which can't be found in my dictionary. Could you please explain that to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Has David started out? is the correct answer.

    I have not heard the phrasal verb "to start along" in any context. You're right that you can also use "to start off" to mean "to begin a journey", although "to set off" would be more common.

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    #3

    Re: start

    You probably would not hear any of those in AmE. Instead, given the context you presented, you would probably hear "Has David left?' OR "Has David left yet?" OR "Has David left already?"

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    #4

    Re: start

    Dear billmcd,

    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    This is exercise which requires the student put appropriate prepositions or adverbs. So I must put a word after "start".

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    You probably would not hear any of those in AmE. Instead, given the context you presented, you would probably hear "Has David left?' OR "Has David left yet?" OR "Has David left already?"

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